Business Administration

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

B.S. in Business Administration

The B.S. in Business Administration focuses on the roles and behaviors necessary to become an effective manager: planning, organizing, problem-solving, leading, operating and controlling. The degree equips students with the professional skills to run a successful & competitive company, and to productively interact with customers, employees and shareholders. Through specialized courses in organizational behavior, business and society, international management and cross-cultural behavior, and creating and managing a small business, you will develop a broad knowledge of the inner workings of all types of commerce.

The College of Management at LIU Post is known for its distinguished professors, state-of-the-art facilities and strong network of successful alumni. Students take classes in a technologically advanced academic environment. The College’s Center for Learning, located in the campus library, is equipped with wireless classrooms, two board rooms, a financial markets classroom, small seminar rooms and a student lounge. Students can increase their future job prospects by interning at corporations and organizations in New York City and on Long Island.

The B.S. degree in Business Administration is accredited by AACSB International (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), the world’s leading business accrediting agency.


Program Curriculum

Course # Course Name Credits
Required Business Administration Courses
(45 Credits)
ACC 11 Accounting Principles I
3
ACC 12 Accounting Principles II
3
FIN 11 Principles of Finance I 3
FIN 12 Principles of Finance II 3
LAW 13 Legal Environment of Business 3
MAN 11 Principles of Management
3
MAN 12 Organizational Behavior  3
MAN 14 Creating and Managing a Small Business
3
MAN 16 Business Communication
MAN 18 Introduction to Business Information Processing
3
MAN 71 Business Policy
MAN 81 Management Seminar
MKT 11 Marketing Principles and Practices 
MKT 14 Consumer Motivation and Behavior 3
QAS 20 Business Statistics
Management Electives
(6 Credits)
QAS 19 Business Analytics
3
MAN 13 Managing Group Dynamics
3
MAN 22  Human Resource Management and Labor Relations  3
MAN 23 Business and Society
3
MAN 31 Negotiation 3
MAN 34 Service Management
3
MAN 51 Production Management
3
MAN 75 International Management and Cross Cultural Behavior
MAN 91 Independent Research Study  3
MAN 92 Independent Research Study
MAN 93 Management Internships
MAN 94 Management Internships
Business Administration Electives
(6 Credits)
Two undergraduate courses from ACC, BUS, DA, FIN, LAW, MAN, MIS, MKT or QAS
Liberal Arts and Sciences Electives 
(27-28 Credits) *
Required Courses (which can be included in core or electives)
ECO 10 Introduction to Microeconomics 3
ECO 11 Introduction to Macroeconomics 3
MTH 4 Introductory Mathematics for Business
3
MTH 6 Calculus for Business and Social Science

Course # Course Name Credits
Required Core Courses 
(32-33 Credits)
POST 101 Post Foundations 1
FY First-Year Seminar 3
ENG 1** Writing 1 3
ENG 2** Writing 2 3
MTH 5 Quantitative Reasoning 3-4 
Choose one course from each of the five below course clusters and one additional course from one of the clusters.
Scientific Inquiry & the Natural World
4
Creativity Media & the Arts 3
Perspectives on World Culture 3
Self, Society & Ethics 3
Power, Institutions & Structures (ECO 10 Required) 3
One additional course from one of the five above clusters. (ECO 11 Required) 3
General Elective
(3 Credits from Any Course)

* Some courses may count as core and others as electives.

** In addition to ENG 1 and 2, students take at least 3 more writing intensive (WAC) courses as part of their major, core, or elective courses.  ENG 303 and 304 can satisfy the ENG 1 and 2 requirement for students in the Honors College.

Credit Requirements
Total Major Requirement Credits 45
Elective Major Credits 12
Total General Elective Credits 3
Total Elective Liberal Arts & Sciences Credits 27-28
Total Core Requirement Credits 32-33
Total Degree Credits 120

Courses

ACC 11 Accounting Principles I

This course presents an introduction to fundamental financial accounting principles, concentrating on identifying, recording, and communicating the economic events of a business organization. This course studies the theory and practice of accounting. Topics covered during the semester include the balance sheet, income statement, and principles required to understand financial accounting systems.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


ACC 12 Accounting Principles II

This course is the second in the accounting principles sequence. The first part of the course focuses on partnerships and the corporate form of business organization, including financial statement analysis and cash flow statements. Students are then introduced to managerial accounting concepts and how they can be used in fostering internal business decision-making. Information concerning the behavior of costs, profit planning, and budgeting is analyzed to enhance meaningful comprehension of managerial accounting. will provide students with a broad overview of IRD research. Topics to be covered include: general principles of theory, and concepts; research design, variables and hypotheses, citations and reference; international news sources and polling data; primary sources and repositories for diplomatic documents; a basic understanding of regression analysis; and the ability to create a research or policy paper as well as research reports. Prerequisite of ACC 11 is required.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


ECO 10 Introduction to Microeconomics

This course discusses the important economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and issues. Its main focus is on the choices made by consumers, producers, and governments, and there interactions of these choices. Topics include demand and supply, consumption, and production, competitive and non-competitive product markets, markets for resources, and welfare. This course fulfills the Power, Institutions, and Structures thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.

Credits: 3
On Occasion


ECO 11 Introduction to Macroeconomics

This course discusses the important economic theory and concepts that facilitate understating economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and questions. Its main focus is on analyzing the behavior of important economic aggregates such as national income, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and economic growth.  The effects of the government's monetary and fiscal policies on economic growth and inflation are also examined. This course fulfills the Power, Institutions, and Structures thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite of ECO 10 is required.

Credits: 3
Every Fall, Spring and Summer


FIN 11 Principles of Finance I

This course provides basic principles by which the modern corporation manages its assets, controls its liabilities and raises new capital. Topics covered include the mathematics of finance, valuation and rates of return on securities, financial statement analysis, forecasting, planning and budgeting, working capital management, introduction to capital budgeting techniques, and cost of capital considerations.  Prerequisite or Co-requisite of ACC 11 is required or permission of Chair.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


FIN 12  Principles of Finance II  

This writing across-the-curriculum course is an analysis of corporate policy with respect to internal financial control, capital budgeting, dividend policy, and the issuance and sale of new securities. Emphasis will be placed on corporate decision-making under uncertainty in areas of investment and financing alternatives, both domestically and internationally. Tools and techniques for risk assessment and risk management will be explored using financial calculators and spreadsheet models. Prerequisites of FIN 11 and ACC 11 are required.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


LAW 13 Legal Environment of Business

This course examines the origins of law, business ethics, court system, business related torts, contracts, agency, partnership, corporations, employment law, intellectual property, and international business law.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


MAN 11 Principles of Management

This course introduces the student to management history, concepts, theories and practices. The managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling are examined.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


MAN 12 Organizational Behavior

This course focuses on human behavior within organizations, including such topics as: motivation, communication, leadership, formal and informal organizations, implementing change, and organizational development.

Prerequisite: MGT 11.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


MAN 13 Managing Group Dynamics

A central factor in achieving productive working relationships is the ability to effectively manage group dynamics. This course examines the dynamics of interpersonal relationships within small groups. Teams will be formed and appropriate exercises conducted to develop interpersonal communication skills required for effective participation in decision-making work groups.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


MAN 14 Creating and Managing a Small Business

An examination and application of the required skills, resources, and techniques that transform an idea into a viable business. Entrepreneurial decision-making is stressed and its role in idea generation, conception, opportunity analysis, and the marshaling of resources. Among the course requirements is that each student will prepare a formal business plan including market research, operational and organizational design, marketing and financial planning.

Prerequisites: MGT 11, FIN 11.

Credits: 3
Every Semester 


MAN 16 Business Communication

This course is designed to improve effective business communication with emphasis on individual and interpersonal skills building. Topics include, but are not limited to, determining appropriate style and tone in various types of written business communications; strengthening verbal effectiveness through the use of presentations and graphics; and learning to interpret and use non-verbal communication for greater impact. This course addresses the unique communication challenges that arise as a result of diversity, globalization and the pervasiveness of technology. Prerequisites: FIN 11, MAN 11, MAN 18, MAN 11. Junior status.

Credits: 3
Every Fall, Spring and Summer


MAN 18 Introduction to Business Information Processing

This course is an introduction to information processing. Emphasis is on computer hardware and software and how it is integrated by end-users for management information systems. Personal Computer packages (spreadsheets, database management systems, and word-processing) will be used to illustrate the tools available to managers.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


MAN 22 Human Resource Management and Labor Relations

This course is a review of current human resource management and labor relations policies, practices and techniques. Topics include recruitment, placement, evaluation and compensation of employees.

Prerequisite: MAN 11.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


MAN 23 Business and Society

This course is a review of the major cultural, political and ethical issues that confront corporate systems in its attempt to adapt to the needs of a changing environment. This course of study includes analysis of the interrelationships of business with government (U.S. and foreign), labor, and the individual in society. Prerequisite: MAN 11.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


MAN 31 Negotiation Strategy

Negotiation is a central part of personal, career, and organizational strategy. Through the study and practice of negotiation students develop strategic thinking, learn about the psychology of bargaining, explore decision making, and recognize psychological biases. Students develop ability to convey important points of view, by analyzing complex bargaining positions while applying the totality of intuition and learning gained through their educational and life experience. The delivery of this class is experiential. Students build advanced interpersonal, communication, presentation, and constructive conflict resolution skills through the use of business-specific, knowledge-intensive exercises and role-plays. Through circumspect situational-analysis balancing ethical consideration students refine strategic thinking. Students will build a comprehensive set of skills necessary for success in any personal, career, entrepreneurial, and organizational setting. The course is highly beneficial to students in the management major and is a very strong elective for personal development that can complement any major.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


MAN 34 Supply Chain Management

The function of supply chain management is to design and manage the processes, assets, and flows of material and information required to satisfy customers’ demands. Globalization of economy and electronic commerce has heightened the strategic importance of supply chain management and created new opportunities for using supply chain strategy and planning as a competitive tool. The course is designed to develop an understanding of key drivers of supply chain performance and provide analytical and problem solving skills necessary for a variety of supply chain management and design problems.

Prerequisite: QAS 20.

Credits: 3
Every Fall


MAN 51 Production Management

This course focuses on the production environment where goods and services are created. The student is guided by the management perspective of organizing and controlling the major elements in the creation of goods and services in an efficient manner. Topics treated include standards, productivity, quality control, materials requirements, planning, cost effectiveness, production control and service factors.

Prerequisites: MAN 11, ECO 72.


MAN 71 Business Policy

This is a capstone course in which the disciplines of management, finance, marketing and accounting are integrated to focus on policy decision-making to solve business problems. Computer based business simulations may be used to make essential policy decisions.

Prerequisites: MAN 11, 18, FIN 11, MAN 11 and Senior status.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


MAN 75 International Management and Cross Cultural Behavior

This course is a survey of managerial actions and practices in a global setting. The impact of economic, political, and socio-cultural differences in international business management are explored. This course provides a framework for understanding cultural differences and the implications of such differences in forming managerial policies.

Prerequisite: MAN 11.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


MAN 81 Management Seminar

In this course, students utilize and direct all previous knowledge attained in the area of management toward the solution of a pragmatic problem. The research project incorporates theoretical and empirical literature plus relevant methodology.

Prerequisite: Senior status.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


MAN 91, 92 Independent Research Study

A program of supervised research in a selected area of management.

Prerequisite: Senior status.

Credits: 1 to 2
Every Fall and Spring


MAN 93-94 Management Internships

Internships will be arranged through the Management Department. These internships are planned programs of research observations, study, and participation in selected organizations. They are designed to enrich classroom study with hands-on practical experience.

Credits: 3
On Occasion


MKT 11 Marketing Principles and Practices

This is the core-marketing course for the LIU Undergraduate Program and it also appeals to non-business-majors who are interested in marketing. The aim of the course is to provide a rigorous and comprehensive introduction to contemporary marketing practice. The participants learn how to analyze complex business situations, identify underlying problems and decide on courses of actions with the help of the modern marketing management techniques. The students learn the concepts and terminology of modern marketing management during lectures, cases and class discussions. Application of the marketing management concepts becomes the focus for the term project.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


MKT 14 Consumer Motivation and Behavior

This course studies consumer behavior from a psychological and sociological perspective stressing consumer motivation, personality, psychographics and lifestyle research, social class and culture, learning theory, attitude formation and change, opinion leadership and diffusion of innovations.

Writing Across Curriculum

Prerequisite of MKT 11 is required

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring

 

QAS 19 Decision Analysis

This course covers the practical application of management science models to business problems. Applications include efficient allocation of scarce resources, project scheduling, network design, inventory management and queuing models.

Prerequisites: Math 6 and ECO 72.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring


QAS 20 Business Statistics

This course introduces some of the statistical concepts and techniques used in business decision-making at an advanced level. The emphasis is on business application. Problems from the functional areas of accounting, finance, marketing, management, and operations are used to illustrate how probabilistic and statistical thinking and analysis can enhance the quality of decisions.

Credits: 3
Every Fall and Spring