Nutrition and Dietetics

B.S. in Nutrition and Dietetics


The Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition and Dietetics prepares graduates for rewarding careers as nutritionists, dietitians, wellness experts, food service managers, and community counselors. The four-year, 120-credit program provides students with a basic liberal arts and strong science education, and the knowledge required to understand nutrition. Students take courses in biology, chemistry and statistics and master such subjects as normal nutrition, medical nutrition therapy, community nutrition, institutional food service management, cultural and social aspects of food, energy and exercise, and food technology. The program also prepares students to apply their knowledge of nutrition to promote healthy eating and lifestyle choices among individuals and groups as well as those with special nutritional needs. The goal of the program is to develop a graduate who meets the foundation knowledge and skills required by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

The B.S. degree includes the Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD). The DPD at LIU Post is currently granted full accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190, Chicago, IL 60606, 312/899-5400. Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to apply to an accredited supervised practice program such as the Dietetic Internship (DI) or to obtain an entry-level position that does not require the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) credential. Students must complete both the B.S. degree and an ACEND- accredited DI to be eligible to sit for the national examination for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists.

The undergraduate nutrition program at LIU Post meets the academic requirements to be a Certified Dietitian/Nutritionist (CDN) in New York State. Successful completion of a DI and the RDN examination qualifies individuals to be a New York State CDN.  

Upon completion of the B.S. in Nutrition and Dietetics degree and the DPD, graduates are also eligible to sit for the Registration Examination for Dietetic Technicians. For information about this examination, visit the Commission on Dietetic Registration website.

Important Message from our Accreditation Agency (ACEND)

How to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist 
  1. Complete a baccalaureate degree from a college or university.
  2. Complete an ACEND accredited Didactic Program in Dietetics and obtain a DPD Verification Statement or complete program specific prerequisites. 
  3. Apply to an ACEND accredited supervised practice program such as a Dietetic Internship (DI) or a Future Graduate Model program.
  4. After completion of an ACEND accredited program, the candidate successfully completes the national credentialing examination for Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN).

To learn more about how to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist contact the Commission on Dietetic Registration of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (A.N.D.).

Effective January 1, 2024, the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) will require a minimum of a master’s degree to be eligible to take the credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN). In addition, CDR requires that individuals complete coursework and supervised practice in program(s) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND). In most states, graduates also must obtain licensure or certification to practice. Graduates who successfully complete the ACEND-accredited MS/RDN Professional Program at Long Island University are eligible to apply to take the CDR credentialing exam to become an RDN.


Degree Requirements

To meet graduation requirements, a student must maintain a major GPA of 3.3 in nutrition (NTR) courses. Students who receive a grade of “B-” in a required NTR course may be required to repeat the course and receive a grade of “B” or better, unless their major GPA exceeds minimum requirements.  Courses cannot be repeated more than once. 

The cumulative GPA must be at least 3.0 for graduation.

Upper level Nutrition/Food courses (Courses required once accepted into the Didactic Program in Dietetics) include:

Nutrition Courses

Credits

NTR 103 Introduction to Nutrition and Dietetics

1

NTR 210 Nutrition in the Community

2

NTR 211 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

3

NTR 212 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

3

NTR 212L Medical Nutrition Therapy II Lab

1

NTR 200 Advanced Concepts in Nutrition 

3

NTR 215 Energy and Exercise

3

NTR 206 Nutrition Communication 

3

NTR 202 Research Methodology

4

Nutrition Courses

Credits

NTR 23 Introduction to Food Hospitality

3

NTR 24 Food Hospitality Management

3

NTR 221 Food in Contemporary Society

3



Course Description

NTR 10 Nutrition

In this course, students learn about the role of nutrition in improving health and applying these ideas to developing a healthy eating pattern. They will understand how food choices and physical activity contribute to total well-being. Open to Non-Majors only.
Open to Non-Majors only.
3 credits

NTR 16 Cultural & Social Aspects of Food

This course examines the role of culture and society as determinants of food preferences and eating patterns. Particular attention is paid to the influences on the food ways of ethnic groups of the New York Metropolitan and Long Island areas. Emphasis is on developing sensitivity to different ethnic groups.
Co-requisite of NTR 16L is required
2 credits

NTR 16L Cultural & Social Aspects of Food Laboratory

In this course, students will prepare traditional dishes from different cuisines around the world. The foods lab experience will include food tastings and discussions about ingredients used to create region-specific dishes.
Co-requisite of  NTR 16 is required
1 credit

NTR 21 Introductory Food Science

A fundamental course about foods that concentrates on the chemical and physical properties affecting the handling, preparation and storage of food. Also includes the effect of microorganisms on the storage, preparation, preservation, processing and serving of food.
Co-requisites of CHM 3 and NTR 21L are required.
3 credits

NTR 21L Introductory Food Science Laboratory

NTR 21L is a laboratory course that accompanies the lecture course NTR 21. Lab exercises are completed in which students prepare foods and observe the chemical and physical properties that affect the product. Students gain experience in fundamental food preparation and critique foods using learned evaluation techniques.
Co-requisites of CHM 3 and NTR 21 are required.
1 credit

NTR 23 Introduction to Food Hospitality

An introduction to the administrative aspects of food service institutions. The basic management principles required to operate a food service in any type of institution.
Pre-requisite or co-requisite of BMS 90 is required 3 credits.

NTR 24 Food Hospitality Management

The principles of food service management including organizational design, leadership qualities, personnel management, financial considerations, and kitchen design are addressed. Field trips and guest speakers are included to acquaint the student with various types of food service facilities and management styles.
Pre-requisite of NTR 23 is required.
3 credits

NTR 99 Independent Study

This course is an independent study which requires approval of the Department Chairperson.
1-3 credits

NTR 100 Concepts in Nutrition

An in-depth view of the six nutrients required for normal healthy metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on nutrient interaction in digestion, absorption, transport, and metabolism.
Pre-requisite of BIO 8 and co-requisite of CHM 3 are required.
3 credits

NTR 101 Contemporary Nutrition Strategies

The selection of an adequate diet using knowledge of a variety of dietary standards. These standards as well as nutrient needs will be incorporated into the planning of diets during the life cycle for pregnant women, infants, children, adolescents, the middle-aged and the elderly.
Pre-requisite of NTR 100 is required.
3 credits

NTR 103 Introduction to Nutrition and Dietetics

This course provides an overview of the profession of nutrition and dietetics, including standards of practice, standards of professional performance, code of ethics, educational and career opportunities, professional credentialing and the dietetic internship application process.  A review of the history, current practices and future trends in nutrition and dietetics will be covered.  
Co-requisites of NTR 210 and NTR 211 are required.
Open to DPD students only.
1 credit

NTR 200 Advanced Concepts in Nutrition

This course provides an in-depth examination of human nutrition and metabolism with emphasis on the interrelationships of nutrients and metabolism based on the principles of biochemistry. Current research issues will be discussed.
Pre-requisites of NTR 101 and CHM 71 are required.
Open to DPD students only.
3 credits

NTR 201 Practicum in Nutrition (elective)

Based on a student’s individual interests, a field site and special project are selected for a 90 hour practical experience. A designated faculty member serves as liaison between the field site and the student. Department consent is required.
Co-requisite of NTR 212 is required.
3 credits

NTR 202 Research Methodology

Introduction to the scientific method of problem-solving. Identification of the research process in nutrition. Development of the practical tools for the interpretation and application of research findings. A research proposal will be completed.
Pre-requisites of MTH 19 or 40 or ECO 72 and co-requisite of NTR 211 are required.
4 credits

NTR 206 Nutrition Communication

Course Description: This course is designed to provide the nutrition student with an overview of oral, written, and technical skills necessary for successful communication and education of patients, the public and allied health professionals. Skills in patient interviewing and counseling will be introduced.
Pre-requisite or co-requisite of NTR 211 is required.
3 credits

NTR 210 Nutrition in the Community

A look at Nutrition Monitoring in the US and the integral components necessary to develop effective programs and services to improve the nutrition and health for all segments of society. Needs assessment, legislation, public policy, program development, monitoring and evaluation will be addressed. 
Co-requisites of NTR 103 and NTR 211 are required.
2 credits

NTR 211 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence covering the pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for specific disorders and diseases. In this initial semester, the cause, prevention and treatment of certain medical conditions such as anemias, liver disease, diabetes mellitus and dysphagia will be examined. Nutritional assessment techniques will be introduced to evaluate dietary, biochemical and anthropometric changes that relate to nutrition and disease processes. Case problems and studies are incorporated to develop clinical practice skills.
Prerequisite of NTR 101 is required.
Open to DPD students only.
3 credits

NTR 212 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence covering the pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for specific disorders and diseases. In this second semester, the causes, prevention and treatment of certain medical conditions such as pulmonary disorders, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease and cancer will be examined. Clinical skills related to interpreting laboratory values and to planning enteral/parenteral nutrition care will also be addressed as will documentation in the medical record and the nutrition care process. Case problems and studies are incorporated into the course to develop clinical practice skills.
Prerequisite of NTR 211 and co-requisite of NTR 212L are required.
Open to DPD students only.
3 credits

NTR 212L Medical Nutrition Therapy Laboratory

Theory and concepts from Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) I and II are applied through a variety of methods such as nutrition assessment, care plans, chart notes, and case studies. Practical application of tools and techniques used for assessment and management of nutritional status will be covered.
Co-requisite of NTR 212 is required.
Open to DPD students only.
1 credit

NTR 215 Energy and Exercise

A discussion of energy needs and factors affecting energy requirements; development and treatment of obesity; characteristics and treatment of eating disorders; nutritional needs and recommendations during physical exercise.
Prerequisite of NTR 100 is required.
3 credits

NTR 221 Food in Contemporary Society

An overview of food legislation, regulations and policies. Issues related to food production and sustainability of the food supply. A discussion of factors leading to the deterioration of food. Methods of food preservation including irradiation, canning, refrigeration, freezing, drying of foods and fermentation. Nutritional losses and nutrification of foods will be discussed. Other topics of current interest such as biotechnology, phytochemicals, functional foods, alternative sweeteners, fat substitutes, and food packaging will be included.
Prerequisites of NTR 21 and CHM 4 are required.
3 credits

Typical Sequence

SAMPLE SCHEDULE
B.S. in Nutrition and Dietetics Degree Plan of Study (120 credits)

Freshman

FALL

SPRING

Course Title

Credits

Course Title

Credits

BIO 7 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I

4

BIO 8 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II

4

PSY 101 – General Psychology

3

ENG 2 - Composition Argument/ Analysis

3

ENG 1 - Composition

3

College Core

3

MTH 3 - College Algebra & Trigonometry

4

Elective

3

COLL 101 - Freshman Seminar

1

Oral Competency

0

Total Credits

15

Total Credits

13

Sophomore

FALL

SPRING

Course Title

Credits

Course Title

Credits

CHM 3 - Principles of Chemistry I

4

CHM 4 - Principles of Chemistry II

4

NTR 21 – Intro Food Science

3

NTR 16 – Cultural & Social Aspects of Food

2

NTR 21L – Intro Food Science Lab

1

NTR 16L – Cultural & Social Aspects of Food Lab

1

 NTR 100 - Concepts in Nutrition

3

NTR 101 – Contemp. Nutrition Strategies

3

Library Competency

0

College Core

6

College Core

3


Total Credits

14

Total Credits

16

Junior

FALL

SPRING

Course Title

Credits

Course Title

Credits

CHM 25 – Basic Organic Chemistry

4

CHM 71 - Basic Biochemistry

4

BMS 90 - Microbiology

4

NTR 24 – Food Hospitality Management

3

NTR 23 – Intro to Food Hospitality

3

NTR 212 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II 

3

NTR 103 - Introduction to Nutrition and Dietetics

1

NTR 212L - Medical Nutrition Therapy II Lab

1

NTR 210 – Nutrition in the Community

2

MTH 19 - Biostatistics

3

NTR 211 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I

3

Total Credits

17

Total Credits

14

Senior

FALL

SPRING

Course Title

Credits

Course Title

Credits

NTR 200 – Advanced Concepts in Nutrition

3

NTR 202 – Research Methodology

4

NTR 206 – Nutrition Communication

3

NTR 221 – Food in Contemporary Society

3

NTR 215 - Energy and Exercise 

3

College Core

3

College Core

6

Electives

6

 

 

Total Credits

16

Total Credits

16

Course offerings can be found here . The academic calendar is available for class start and end dates, as well as vacations and holidays.



Student Handbook

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Mission Statement

The mission of the Didactic Program in Dietetics is in line with the mission of the Department of Nutrition that meets the Standards set forth by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND). The Didactic Program in Dietetics includes an extensive study in nutrition and dietetics, as well as a broad liberal arts and science education that provides a strong foundation for students to develop intellectual awareness, cultural appreciation and social responsibility. The program also provides innovative academic opportunities to assist students in developing critical thinking and effective communication skills. The program’s goals aim to prepare students for supervised practice, ultimately leading to eligibility for the CDR credentialing exam to become registered dietitian nutritionists. In addition, emphasis is placed on life-long learning as a means for dietetics professionals to remain informed and knowledgeable in an evolving profession.

Program Goals & Objectives

  • Program Goal 1: The program will prepare graduates who will have a broad educational background in communication, the physical and biological sciences, the social sciences, research, food, nutrition and resource management that will lead to careers in foods, nutrition and dietetics.
    • Objective 1: At least 85% of program students complete program/degree requirements within 3 years (150% of the program length).
    • Objective 2: At least 60% of the DPD graduates will apply for admission to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation
    • Objective 3: At least 80% of the DPD graduates are admitted to supervised practice programs within 12 months of graduation
    • Objective 4: The program’s one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the CDR credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%.
    • Objective 5: Supervised Practice Program Directors who respond to the survey will report an average of 3 on a 4-point scale that LIU Post DPD graduates are well prepared for the DI in all subject areas.
    • Objective 6: One-year alumni respondents who are currently in a Dietetic Internship (DI) and who complete the survey will report that they were academically “very well prepared” (score = 5) or “well prepared” (score = 4) for the DI.
  • Program Goal 2: Prepare graduates to incorporate evidenced-based research, guidelines, and recommendations through life-long learning to function effectively in an interprofessional setting for the practice of nutrition and dietetics while exhibiting social responsibility and cultural appreciation.
    • Objective 1: At least 85% of 1-year alumni respondents who complete the survey, will report that evidence-based research, guidelines, and recommendations were incorporated effectively (at least 4- on a 5-point scale) in the curriculum.
    • Objective 2: At least 85% of 1-year alumni respondents who complete the survey, will report that the program prepared them to function effectively (at least 4- on a 5-point scale) in an interprofessional setting
    • Objective 3: At least 50% of respondents who completed the survey will apply and be accepted to graduate school.
    • Objective 4: At least 85% of 1-year alumni respondents who complete the survey, will report that the program prepared them to practice social responsibility (at least 4- on a 5-point scale).
    • Objective 5: At least 85% of 1-year alumni respondents who complete the survey, will report that the program prepared them for practice in culturally diverse settings (at least 4- on a 5-point scale).

Program information and outcome achievement data are available upon request from the DPD Program Director through the Nutrition Department  at 516-299-2762 or post-nutrition@liu.edu.

 

Faculty

Laura Feldman, MS, RD, CDN, CDE 

Director, Undergraduate Didactic Program in Dietetics

Assistant Professor of Nutrition

Department of Diagnostic Health Professions

Long Island University, Post Campus

516-299-4152

Laura.Feldman@liu.edu



Dr. Kathy Isoldi, PhD, RDN, CDN

Associate Professor

Department of Diagnostic Health Professions

Long Island University, Post Campus

516-299-3077

Kathy.isoldi@liu.edu

 


Dr. Deborah Salvatore, DCN, RDN, CDN

Director, Graduate Nutrition Programs

Assistant Professor of Nutrition
Department of Diagnostic Health Professions 

Long Island University, Post Campus
516-299-3224

Deborah.salvatore@liu.edu

CONTACT

School of Health Professions
Margaret Stroehlein, Dean

(516) 299-4053