Counseling & Development

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY

MS School Counseling

The Master of Science in School Counseling program is nationally accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).  By maintaining CACREP accreditation, the program strives to provide the highest quality of faculty and curriculum standards.  The program prepares students to work with young people from a developmental perspective to clarify goals, to overcome behavioral and social obstacles, and to enhance the learning experience. Graduates of this program help students cope with a myriad of problems. They learn effective individual and group counseling techniques and gain practical field experience through internships at all levels (elementary, middle and high school). This 60-credit program, plus two years of experience as a school counselor in New York, leads to permanent New York State certification as a school counselor.

For more information on the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) model, click here.

Click here to view the Student Handbook.


PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER’S DEGREE

SCHOOL COUNSELING (SC)

DEPARTMENTAL CORE COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS 

Course #                                                Title                                                                Credit Hours

EDC 610             Psychopathology for the Professional Counselor                                                 3 cr.

EDC 613             Diversity and Socio-Cultural Issues in Counseling                                              3 cr.

EDC 614             Human Growth and Development Over the Life Span                                         3 cr.

                           (co-requisite: EDC 602)

EDC 615             Theories of Counseling                                                                                         3 cr.

(Pre-requisite or co-requisite: EDC 602)

EDC 668             Counseling Pre-Practicum                                                                                    3 cr.

(Pre-requisites or co-requisites: EDC 602, 615)

EDC 669             Counseling Practicum                                                                                          6 cr.

                           (Pre-requisite: 668; Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: EDC 610)

EDC 676             Career Development                                                                                             3 cr.

EDC 687             Group Counseling: Theory and Practice                                                              3 cr.

EDC 702             Research Methods in Counseling                                                                         3 cr.

SCHOOL COUNSELING SPECIALIZATION

EDC 602             Introduction to School Counseling and Ethics                                                     3 cr.

EDC 659             School Counseling:  College Admissions & Educational Planning                     3 cr.

                           (Pre-requisite:  EDC 602)

EDC 654             Introduction to Addiction                                                                                     3 cr.

EDC 670             Educational Tests and Measurements                                                                  3 cr.

EDC 653             Evidence Based Practices for School Counselors                                                3 cr.

EDC 604             Leadership, Advocacy, Collaboration and Systemic Changes                             3 cr.

EDC 616             Family Counseling                                                                                               3 cr.

EDC 690             School Counseling Internship I (300 hrs.)                                                           3 cr.

                           (Pre-requisites: EDC 669; Pre-requisite or Co-requisite EDC 614, EDC 687, 659)

EDC 691             School Counseling Internship II (300 hrs.)                                                          3 cr.

                           (Pre-requisite: EDC 690)

ELECTIVE                                                                                                         3 cr.

TOTAL                                                                                                                                      60 cr.



Program Requirements

Required Courses

EDC 610

Psychopathology for the Professional Counselor

3.00

EDC 613

Diversity and Socio-Cultural Issues in Counseling

3.00

EDC 614

Human Growth and Development Over the Lifespan

3.00

EDC 615

Theories of Counseling

3.00

EDC 616

Family Counseling

3.00

EDC 668

Counseling Pre-Practicum

3.00

EDC 669

Counseling Practicum

6.00

EDC 676

Career Development

3.00

EDC 687

Group Counseling:  Theory and Practice

3.00

EDC 702

Research Methods In Counseling

3.00

Specialization Requirements

EDC 602

Introduction to School Counseling and Ethics

3.00

EDC 653

Evidenced-Based School Counseling

3.00

EDC 654

Introduction to Addiction Counseling

3.00

EDC 604

Leadership, Advocacy, Collaboration and Systemic Change

3.00

EDC 659

College Admissions and Educational Planning

3.00

EDC 670

Educational Tests and Measurements

3.00

EDC 690

School Counseling Internship I

3.00

EDC 691

School Counseling Internship II

3.00

Elective

3.00

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER’S DEGREE School Counselor(SC)
DEPARTMENTAL CORE COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS

Each student in the M.S. in School Counselor program, in consultation with his or her academic counselor, develops and follows a plan of study. Every semester, the student may consult with an assigned faculty advisor on course selection and completion of the study plan. All students are required to meet with their faculty advisor upon completion of 12 credits for an Interim Assessment. Such an assessment allows both the advisor and the student to discuss the student’s progress and achievement and to identify any areas of concern. Each degree candidate will be required to complete at least 90 hours of practicum experience in a field setting (EDC 669, Counseling Practicum) and 600 hours of internship experience (EDC 690, School Counseling Internship I, and EDC 691, School Counseling Internship II).

CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

Students will take the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination administered by the Center for Credentialing and Education. Students will take the exam the semester before the semester in which they graduate. There is an examination fee which covers the cost for administration and scoring of the exam.  This fee is set by the CCE and is subject to change. Please check with the department for the current fee.

Note: Upon completion of 12 credits, all students are required to meet with their faculty advisor for an Interim Assessment. Such an assessment allows both the advisor and the student to discuss the student’s progress and achievement and to identify any areas of concern.

Program Admission

It is recommended that an Application for Admission to the M.S. in School Counseling or the Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs be submitted at least one month prior to the start of classes. Applications are accepted for the Fall semester only.

All applications and requested materials (i.e. application fee, transcripts, letters of recommendation, personal statement) should be submitted to the LIU Post Graduate Admissions Processing Center.

To apply for admission: 

1. Long Island University Online Application for Admission
Applicants must complete the Long Island University Online Application for Admission. You can also request that a graduate application be mailed to you by calling 516-299-2900 or emailing post-enroll@liu.edu.

2. Application Fee
Mail a non-refundable application fee of $50 by either check or money order (made payable to Long Island University) or contact the Bursar to submit fee via credit card. Please write your name on the check or money order, if that is your preferred method of payment. International applicants must pay the fee in U.S. dollars by sending an international money order or check. You can also pay by credit card by printing the Credit Card Authorization form on the Bursar website or by calling 516-299-2323. Cash, international postal money orders or Eurochecks are not accepted.

3. Transcripts
Submit official undergraduate and/or graduate transcript with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Applicants who will have not completed their degrees prior to admission deadlines should submit a transcript without the final semester’s grades. Such applicants may be accepted pending receipt of their final degree noted transcripts. Submit one copy of official transcripts from all other institutions attended, including other graduate programs.

International students should refer to the International Admissions website for    transcript requirements.

4. Letters of Recommendation
Submit two professional and/or academic letters of recommendation that address your potential for success in the profession and your ability to complete a graduate program. Letters of recommendation should be from an academic source, preferably a professor or academic official who is familiar with your academic history and achievement. If you have been out of school for several years, recommendations may come from your employer or supervisor. The references should be given the Letter of Recommendation signed by you, along with a stamped envelope addressed to: Graduate Admissions, LIU Post, Admissions Processing Center, P.O. Box 805, Randolph, MA 02368-0805.

5. Personal Statement
Submit a statement of approximately 500 to 1,000 words describing your reason for pursuing graduate study at LIU, your personal and academic background, relevant experience, and your professional goals. You may submit this statement as part of the Online Application for Admission, or follow at a later date as a hard copy.

6.  Submit GRE Results
If applicable (see Admission Requirements on left-hand navigation bar) submit the results of the Graduate Record Exam. Inquiries concerning this testing program and application to take the test should be addressed to the Graduate Record Examinations, Educational Testing Service at www.gre.org, or call 1-800-GRE-CALL. Ask ETS to send an official copy of your scores to the LIU Post Graduate Admissions Office. The institution code for the LIU Post is 2070.

7.  International Students
In addition to the requirements listed above, international applicants must submit official score results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The required minimum acceptable TOEFL score is: 79 Internet-based (213 computer-based or 550 paper-based) or minimum IELTS score: 6.5. International students whose native language is English, or who have attended for at least two years an accredited College or University where the only medium of instruction is English, may have the English Language proficiency requirement waived. The waiver is determined on an individual basis following a review of the student’s application. Students whose English Language proficiency is below the required minimum score but who are academically admissible will be “Conditionally Admitted” to the program and required to first complete LIU Post’s English Language Institute prior to enrolling in any academic coursework.

SEND US YOUR APPLICATION MATERIALS

Graduate applicants can send their admissions materials to:
Long Island University
Graduate Admissions Office
720 Northern Blvd.
Brookville, NY 11548

International applicants should send their admissions materials to:
LIU Post
720 Northern Blvd.
Brookville, NY 11548-1300 USA

NEED HELP WITH YOUR ADMISSIONS APPLICATION?

If you have any questions about the admissions application process or requirements, please contact the Department of Counseling and Development graduate advisors at 516-299-2183 or call the LIU Post Graduate Admissions Office at 516-299-2900 or email post-enroll@liu.edu.

Course Descriptions

COURSES IN COUNSELING AND DEVELOPMENT

EDC 601 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling and Ethics (CMHC)
To be taken as the first course in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling specialization, within the student’s first 15 semester hours of work. This course is an introduction to preventive education and counseling for mental and emotional health as uniquely available in mental health centers. The course prepares students to work in counseling teams and enrichment programs, to handle referral procedures, community relations and teamwork, and to deal with mental health problems in terms of their etiology and the innovations in the field. The Graduate Handbook is required reading for the course.
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 602 Introduction to School Counseling and Ethics (SC)
This is the basic introductory course that exposes the student to the world of professional counseling with an emphasis on school counseling. It also provides the student with training in ethics within the counseling profession with specific attention given to the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics and the Code of Ethics of the American School Counselors Association (ASCA). This foundation course in school counseling prepares students to apply basic counseling skills in an elementary, middle or high school setting. Emphasis is placed on the expanded role of the school counselor in curriculum, instruction, assessment, and consultation as well as providing training in the ASCA National Model of School Counseling. Focus is placed on the various roles of the elementary, middle and secondary school counselor, tools and strategies appropriate in those settings, and consultation and collaboration with other school personnel. The course will also cover concepts and techniques of the counseling process in the school setting, behavioral and developmental problems, and enhancing the creative capabilities of students. It will help to prepare prospective school counselors to develop, plan, and implement a comprehensive school counseling program, including the college admission process, and to understand their roles as professional school counselors in helping students reach their academic, career, social, and personal potential. The course will also explore job opportunities on Long Island, New York City, upstate New York and nationally. The Graduate Handbook is required reading for the 
course.
3 credits
Fall only 

EDC 608 Diagnostic Interviewing and Assessment in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC)
This course is a weekly seminar focused on, but not limited to, the following: the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, referral and prevention of mental disorders through the utilization of current diagnostic assessment tools, including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) and International Classification of Diseases (ICD); psychological assessment, case conceptualization, psychopathology, diagnostic intake interviewing, mental status evaluation, biopsychosocial history, mental health history, psychological assessment for treatment planning and caseload management guidelines. 
Prerequisites: EDC 610 and EDC 615
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 610 Psychopathology for the Professional Counselor (CMHC and SC)
This course provides an in-depth review of a broad spectrum of psychopathological conditions as defined in the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association. The course will focus on understanding the etiology, prevalence and incidence, signs and symptoms of the various 
mental disorders delineated in the DSM. A focus will also be placed on learning the criteria necessary to provide a differential diagnosis. There will also be an emphasis on increasing understanding of clinical issues and current research in development and maladaptive behavior and on comparing and contrasting different theoretical perspectives on each mental disorder. Ethical issues and limitations related to current diagnostic systems will be discussed. This course will provide the student with a solid foundation in psychopathology and enhance the student’s mastery in understanding the pathogenesis of the various mental disorders. 
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 611 Evidence Based Treatment Planning in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC)

Evidenced based practice (EBP) has steadily become the standard of care in the mental health field. This course is a weekly seminar focused on introducing clinical mental health counseling student trainees to the process of empirically informing their psychotherapy treatment plans. Empirically supported treatments (EST) are treatments whose efficacy has been demonstrated through clinical research. The course will cover: psychopharmacology; cognitive behavior therapy; rational emotive cognitive behavior therapy; behavior therapy; eye movement desensitization reprocessing; dialectical behavior therapy; acceptance and commitment 
therapy, motivational interviewing; exposure therapies; interpersonal psychotherapy; and other empirically supported treatment approaches as necessary.
Prerequisite: EDC 608
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 612 Trauma (Counseling Elective)
This course validates and addresses the emergent new field of trauma studies and the growing body of trauma related best practices. It provides mental health counselors and other mental health practitioners with a comprehensive review of the various types of trauma experiences, the human vulnerability for traumatic experiences a cross the life span, and the intersections among trauma, crisis and disaster events. It discusses pertinent diagnostic and case conceptualization issues as well as presents individual systems interventions and collaborations. The course offers and presents
a rich array of trauma related resources which includes websites, 
films, manuals, DVDs, and a variety of other useful tools. 
3 credits Rotating Basis

EDC 613 Diversity and Socio-Cultural Issues in Counseling (CMHC and SC)
Major twenty first century contributions of sociology and anthropology will be examined with a view to understanding the role of sociocultural factors in human development and behavior. This course will also 
examine the impact of the sociocultural viewpoint on contemporary concepts of adaptive and maladaptive human behavior and related mental health issues.
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 614 Human Growth and Development Over the Lifespan (CMHC and SC)

This course focuses on understanding the principles and rationale of developmental counseling over the lifespan from a multicultural perspective. Students become familiar with the primary functions of the developmental counselor: counseling, consulting, coordinating, assessment and advocacy. Students will examine the 
developmental theories of Piaget, Erikson, Vygosky and others. They will examine the cognitive, physical, social and emotional development of the individual during early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence and adulthood. In addition to an overview of developmental stages and developmental tasks which children face, the course includes exploration and experimentation with various and unique methods used in developmental counseling. Students will explore various developmental crises and impediments to optimum development and, in small groups, do an oral report of their findings.  They will compile a developmental portfolio, presenting characteristics of each developmental milestone, and develop a comprehensive guidance plan to address the developmental needs during the 
school years. 
A pre-requisite or co-requisite of EDC 601 or EDC 602
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 615 Theories of Counseling (CMHC and SC)
This is a basic course in counseling theories and techniques and their application within a multicultural and diverse society. Students gain an understanding of the major theories of counseling and psychotherapy, (e.g. psychoanalytic, existential, person-centered, gestalt, reality, behavioral, cognitive behavioral and family systems, etc). In addition, the counselor as a person and a professional is explored as well as ethical issues in counseling and therapy.
Pre-requisites or Co-requisites: EDC 601or 602
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 616 Family Counseling (CMHC)
This course offers a consideration of theories, practices and related activities with couples, parents and/or other related adults and children. Included in the course is a survey of some major trends and problems associated with individual adjustments, adaptations and other reactions within family and social settings.
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 617 Principles of Couple Counseling (Elective)
A study of the theoretical and practical aspects of couple counseling from initial referral to termination. The difference between this form and individual, group or family counseling will be examined in order to understand the clinical issues involved. Both the object relations and the systemic theories will be studied with emphasis on the clinical application to help couples change, according to their therapeutic goals.
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 652 Counselor’s Approach to Human Sexuality (Elective)
A study of human sexuality from its normal manifestations and development to its dysfunctions. The student will be guided to examine his/her own attitudes and values in this area and to learn counseling approaches to problems and questions related to sexuality.
3 credits
Rotating basis

EDC 654 Introduction to Addictions Counseling(Elective)
Alcoholism, addiction and substance abuse as behavioral psychological problems are analyzed to enable professional counselors to integrate current theories of abuse and addiction and etiological models into their work with individuals manifesting problems with abuse and dependence on alcohol or other substances. The course will provide a comprehensive overview of the full spectrum of addictive disorders and their consequences. Approaches to the assessment and evaluation of alcoholism and substance abuse will be 
reviewed, discussed and analyzed, as well as, cross cultural concerns and considerations. Training in tobacco use and nicotine dependence will also be covered. Ethical guidelines for addiction counseling will be addressed as detailed in the ethical guidelines of the National Association for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors 
(NAADAC).
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 657 Treatment Approaches in Addictions Counseling (Elective)
Treatment planning and treatment setting are critical elements related to the efficacy of all substance abuse programs. This course continues the study of addictions counseling and substance abuse by building upon the concepts of accurate assessment and diagnosis. Students will become familiarize with the processes of treatment planning and the various approaches to treatment including psychotherapeutic, group, pharmacotherapy, and 12-step programs, as well as maintenance and relapse prevention. The course will covered the various treatment populations including families, persons with disabilities, children, adolescents, college students and the LGBT 
population. Co-occurring disorders to addiction treatment will also be reviewed. 
Pre-requisite: EDC 654
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 658 Critical Treatment Issues Confronting Professional Counselors (Elective)
Newly graduated mental health professionals are frequently confronted with specific mental health issues or common client problems for which they do not feel adequately prepared to deal with. Such mental health issues/problems include eating disorders, sexual abuse, self-injurious behavior, body-image disorders, suicide, trauma, grief/bereavement and sexual minorities. This course will provide the counselor trainee with essential information on these critical mental health issues so that they will develop a solid foundation from which to develop competencies and skills necessary to effectively treat clients manifesting such issues. This course is intended to enhance awareness on important mental health issues that will promote professional competence, as well as provide sufficient basic information about the treatment options available and recommendations for resources to consult. 
3 credits 
Rotating basis

EDC 659 School Counseling: College Admissions & Educational Planning (SC)
This course provides a deeper exploration into the multifaceted roles of the school counselor. Topics of discussion include the processes of educational planning, the college admissions process, family community partnerships, students with special needs and varying exceptionalities, the impact of current special education regulation, and current educational standards.
Pre-requisite EDC 602
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 660 Practicum in Psychological Testing for Counselors (CMHC)
This course is a laboratory experience designed to develop adequate understandings and competencies with respect to concerns, issues, and implementation factors related to administration, scoring, recording and interpretations of aptitude, intelligence tests, as well as interest and personality inventories. 
Prerequisite: EDC 601
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 668 Counseling Pre-Practicum (CMHC and SC)
This is a basic counseling laboratory course designed to provide supervised practical counseling experience from a life span and a multicultural perspective that can be applied in the school or agency. Students learn the basics in terms of the active listening skills and the use of appropriate counseling techniques through role-play and other activities. Students will be required to complete three (3) actual tape recorded sessions with an individual who will serve as a “practice” client. These tape recorded sessions will serve as material for in-class discussions on how to utilize basic counseling techniques in a simulated therapeutic encounter. Interview summaries, detailed analysis, and other relevant counseling experiences are a part of the course. Orientation to the role of the professional counselor and ethical concerns are discussed.
Pre-requisite or co-requisite of
EDC 601 or 602, EDC 615
3 credits 
Fall and Spring

EDC 669 Counseling Practicum (CMHC and SC)
This course is an in depth counseling laboratory course designed to provide supervised practical counseling experience from a life span and multicultural perspective through successful completion of 100 hours of to which sixty (60) hours of observation, interaction, and supervision at a school or mental health agency site; thirty (30) hours of direct service via individual and group counseling to clients at that site; and ten (10) hours off site with clients who will be audio-taped. The purpose of the sixty hours, which can be interspersed throughout the semester, is to acclimate the practicum students to the environment in which the counseling experience occurs. Interview summaries, detailed analyses, and other relevant counseling experiences are a part of this course. Again, it must be emphasized that Practicum students in 669 must provide forty (40) hours of direct service to clients of which thirty (30) hours take place at a school or agency site and ten (10) hours are provided to non-site clients. With on-site clients, practicum students are to document and describe each individual and group counseling experience, which are to be shared with the cooperating counselor and reflected in the logs given to 
the University professor. These clients are supervised by and remain the primary responsibility of the cooperating counselor. The remaining ten (10) hours with non-site clients are audio recorded and shared only with the University professor and the other students in EDC 669. Practicum students meet in group seminar with the University professor every week. In addition, the University professor provides an hour of individual or triadic supervision (i.e., professor and two students), the time for which is built into this six (6) credit course. 
While the professor and the two students are interacting, the other practicum students observe the supervision being given by the professor. After the triadic supervision occurs, the observing students will be asked to offer their comments and suggestions, immediately after the triadic supervision or during the group class. The appropriate roles of the professional counselor, based upon the Ethical Guidelines of the American Counseling Association, are covered. This course 
is also designed to develop and extend the student’s understanding and competencies begun in 668, Counseling Pre-Practicum. This course must be completed prior to taking EDC 683, Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I or EDC 690, School Counseling Internship I. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students.  Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor.
Prerequisite: EDC 668; Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: EDC 610
6 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 670 Educational Tests and Measurements (SC)
This is a survey course in the principles and practices of testing and assessment used in schools. After a quick look at the concepts of educational statistics, and the underlying mathematical basis of standardized tests, the student will examine the most widely used tests and assessments that he/she will be expected to know and understand in the K-12 setting: achievement tests, interest inventories, aptitude and intelligence measures. In addition, time will be devoted to the New York State Learning Standards, and the assessments which will accompany the higher graduation requirements.
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 676 Career Development (CMHC & SC)
This course provides students with an in-depth study of theories and emerging patterns in career development counseling, as well as their application across a range of settings including schools and agencies. Emphasis is placed on practical counseling techniques, psychoeducational approaches, and evaluation of resources used in 
career counseling and education. Attention is given to psychological, sociological, economic, and educational dynamics; multicultural, gender, and disability perspectives of career development are also discussed. Technological and other current trends as they relate to career counseling and education are reviewed. 
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 683 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship I (CMHC)

This course is designed for students in the latter part of the graduate 
program, after having taken considerable theory and course work in the counseling process. The student is required to attend seminar meetings, to prepare weekly logs directed toward observation, insight, and evaluation of activities in the field setting. Related professional readings are also required. The student is expected to develop a counseling caseload, participate in group work, attend staff meetings, and meet with the field supervisor for evaluation. A minimum of 300 hours in a mental health counseling setting, acceptable to the department is required. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 669; Pre-requisite or Co-Requisite EDC 601, 608, 687
3 credits
Fall, Spring and Summer

EDC 684 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship II (CMHC)
A second semester internship required for clinical mental health counseling students. Course content and time requirements are the same as for EDC 683. A minimum of 300 hours in a mental health setting, approved by the department is required. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and 
Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 683
Fall, Spring and Summer 
3 credits

EDC 685 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship III (CMHC)
CMHC Advanced Certificate Only
This course consists of supervised experience involving 300 hours in 
an approved mental health counseling setting. Professional readings are required. However, the student at this level is expected to be self-initiating and able to perform both competently and creatively in considerable depth in achieving the objectives of the course at the practitioner level. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students 
may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
3 credits
On Occasion


EDC 686 Clinical Mental Health Counseling Internship IV (CMHC)
CMHC Advanced Certificate Only
This course is a continuation of the advanced internship placement and seminar experience as it consists of supervised experience involving 300 hours in an approved mental health counseling setting. Professional readings are required. However, the student at this level is expected to be self-initiating and able to perform both competently and creatively in considerable depth in achieving the objectives of the course at the practitioner level. Health insurance required for Clinical Mental Health Counseling students. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Pre requisite of EDC 685
3 credits
On Occasion

EDC 687 Group Counseling: Theory and Practice (CMHC and SC)
This course will examine the dynamics present in a counseling group and how these forces can be employed in the service of therapeutic change. Leadership styles and skills will be discussed with special consideration given to their application and impact on members. The progressive stages in group development will be identified. Concomitant strategies for addressing relevant issues within the stages will be presented. Practical considerations necessary for screening potential members, beginning/ending groups, process interventions, discussing confidentiality and ethical considerations will be included. A variety of theoretical orientations on groups will be explored. This course will also provide students with a practical application of group counseling skills through participation in a group experience.
3 credits
Fall and Spring


EDC 690 School Counseling Internship I (SC)
This course is designed for students in the latter part of the graduate program, after having taken considerable theory and course work in the counseling process. The student is required to attend seminar meetings, to prepare weekly logs directed toward observation, insight, and evaluation of activities in the field setting. Related professional readings are also required. The student is expected to develop a counseling caseload, participate in group work, attend staff meetings, and meet with the field supervisor for evaluation. A minimum of 300 hours in a school setting, acceptable to the department is required. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 669, 659 Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EDC 614; EDC 687
3 credits
Fall only

EDC 691 School Counseling Internship II (SC)
This course consists of supervised experience involving 300 hours in an approved school setting. Course content and time requirements are the same as EDC 690. Hours may not accrue until the signed permission form is submitted to the course professor. Students may not have two sites or two supervisors without the prior approval of the Chair, Department of Counseling and Development.
Prerequisites: EDC 690
3 credits
Spring only

EDC 700 Independent Study (CMHC and SC)
Independent study involves in-depth development of a project idea as an area of study in a previous course. Permission to take this course is based on the merit of the proposed study and the needs and background of the student. Permission requires the signature of the faculty member sponsoring the study, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Education, Information and Technology at LIU Post. Independent study is not allowed in place of a course offered as part of the program. Hours are arranged. Offered on Rotation
1, 2, or 3 credits
On Occasion

EDC 702 Research Methods in Counseling (CMHC and SC)
This is a course in the understanding of the use, process, and applications of research findings in counseling. Students will examine recent research studies, explore topics of particular interest to them, and prepare a draft research proposal on an issue of their choosing. This course is project based, relevant, and practical.
3 credits
Fall and Spring

EDC 750 Special Topics in Counseling (Elective)
Summer Session institutes and workshops are three-credit courses, one week in length, designed to enrich one’s graduate or post-graduate education by focusing on topics that are of timely interest and concern to working professionals. Often institutes are team-taught by experts in their field, offering students a unique opportunity 
to accelerate their academic progress for personal, professional and career advancement. All courses are open to visiting students and working professionals.
• The Adolescent in Crisis: Detection, Intervention and Referral
• Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT): Theory, Practice and Techniques
• Counseling the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual or Transgender Client/Student
• Grief Counseling with Clients Facing Dying, Death, Bereavement, Trauma and Loss
• Helping Parents Help Their Children: Practical Strategies for LMHC Practitioners and School Support Personnel
• Spirituality in Counseling and Psychotherapy: A Dimension of Integrative Healing
3 credits
Rotating basis Summer only

Accreditation

“The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), has granted Re-accreditation to the following programs in the Department of Counseling and Development at Long Island University: Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.S.), School Counseling (M.Ed.).” By maintaining CACREP accreditation, the program strives to provide the highest quality of faculty and curriculum standards. 

To view all CACREP and program assessment information click here.  

LIU Post has been approved by OASAS (Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services) as an Education and Training Provider. Our master’s degree program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling meets all the educational requirements for the  CASAC-T (Certified Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Counselor – Trainee Certificate). 

The Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is a licensure qualifying bridge program approved by the New York State Education Department (NYSED), Office of the Professions.  The Advanced Certificate in CMHC offers the opportunity for individuals with a master’s degree in school counseling or other related counseling fields to meet the educational requirements for licensure as a clinical mental health counselor in New York State.

CACREP Liaison

Contact: Dr. Dogukan Ulupinar
Dogukan.Ulupinar@liu.edu

Frequently Asked Questions

1. How is admission to the programs determined?

The graduate programs in counseling at LIU Post consider the whole person in making admission decisions. No one factor determines a student's admission. Program faculty look for individuals who are creative, flexible and hard-working, are well-rounded students with strong undergraduate grades in the behavioral sciences (minimum undergraduate GPA 3.0), letters of support from two relevant references, a strong personal statement, and performance during the interview. The personal interview is considered a significant factor in program admission. 

2. I have not been in graduate school for many years. Can I still be successful student in the programs?

The length of time since your last attendance in school will not be a selection criterion. Admission to our programs is competitive and selective, but we are confident that our comprehensive approach to candidate selection will result in inviting the best prospective participants to join the program.  We firmly believe that those with significant life and work experience, in addition to meeting the selection criteria, add significantly to the meaningful diversity of class experiences for all.  

3. What can students do if they do not meet the academic requirements?

Only those applicants who do not meet the minimum undergraduate 3.0 GPA standard are asked to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), with scores than being forwarded to Admissions. Based on GRE scores, Department faculty will then review other aspects of the application to determine if the individual will be interviewed.  

4. What undergraduate courses best prepare students for these programs?

Psychology and behavioral sciences courses provide a strong foundation for the school counseling and mental health counseling programs.   However, applicants contribute significantly to the programs by coming from diverse academic backgrounds and majors. Individuals with diverse academic backgrounds are regularly admitted into the programs.  

5. Can students transfer credits from another college or university?

Students may be able to transfer some credits into the program contingent upon review of a formal transcript by the Chairperson, Department of Counseling and Development.  

6. Is prior counseling experience required for admission into the clinical mental health counseling program?  

Clinical experience is not a requirement for admission into the program, but such experience, including on a volunteer basis or as a formal internship, is considered relevant when applying for clinical mental health counseling positions.

7. Is prior teaching experience required for admission into the school counseling program? 

Teaching experience is not a requirement for admission into the program, but such experience, including on a volunteer basis or as a Teaching Assistant, is considered relevant when applying for school counseling positions.

8. What type of financial assistance is available for the programs?

Students interested in applying for financial aid should contact Student Financial Services at 516-299-3159.

9. Can I start the program in the spring semester?

New cohorts begin each fall and spring semester for the clinical mental health counseling program. New cohorts begin each fall for the school counseling program.  There is no spring admission into the school counseling program.

10. How can I be admitted into the Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling?  

The Advanced Certificate in Clinical Mental Health Counseling is a “licensure-qualifying” bridge program approved by the New York State Education Department (NYSED). In order to be admitted to the program, students must have a master's degree in school counseling or other related counseling degree and specified core educational content areas as delineated in the state regulations for mental health counselor licensure. Individuals must have a minimum of 60 graduate credits in designated curriculum areas to qualify for licensure. Depending on the number of credits in their master's degree program candidates may be required to take additional coursework from 18-24 credits to ensure meeting the state requirements of a minimum of 60 graduate credits. Upon application candidates will have their transcript(s) reviewed by the department to ascertain the needed number of graduate credits required for the advanced certificate. 

Programs

1. Are you a Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) program?

Our New York State approved Clinical Mental Health Counseling and School Counseling Programs are CACREP accredited. We have designed and continue to adapt the programs with the highest standards possible to insure the highest level of student professional preparation and to ensure continued accreditation. 

2. How long does it typically take to complete the programs?

Full-time students admitted based on the New York State Education Department guidelines can complete the School Counseling program in 2.5-3 years (including internships); there are pre-requisite courses that anchor the curriculum, which means that these courses must be completed before beginning the next course. Full-time students can complete the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program in 2.5 to 3 years (including internships); there is a more flexible curriculum guided by established course pre-requisites.  Please refer to the Student Handbook for course descriptions and detailed outlines of programs of study.  

3. How many credits are required for full-time status?

A total of 9 credits per semester is considered full-time graduate study at LIU Post.

4. Is it possible to fulfill the program requirements as a part-time student?

Yes. Many of our students pursue their graduate studies part-time under advisement, as they are often working professionally. Importantly, all program requirements for both the school counseling and clinical mental health counseling programs must be completed within five years.

5. Can students begin the programs in the summer session?

Due to pre-requisite courses and course sequences, most students begin their program of study in either the fall or spring semester.  

6. When are classes typically scheduled?

Classes are usually scheduled in the evenings. Almost all counseling program courses are offered after 4:30 p.m., with many also scheduled at 7:20 p.m. Summer class schedules may vary and include full-day week-long elective institutes. 

7. Is there a thesis or a comprehensive exam that must be taken in order to graduate?

There is no thesis requirement for graduation for both programs. However, passing the Counselor Education Comprehensive Examination (CECE) is required for graduation from both the school counseling and clinical mental health counseling programs. This examination assesses students' mastery of the eight core areas deemed critical to a counseling knowledge-base as set forth by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The exam is taken in the student’s second to last semester of study.  If a student fails this examination, the student may retake the examination during their final semester of study.  The CECE is offered in the fall, spring and summer semesters. 

8. Can students work full time while in the program?

Class scheduling permits students to work full or part-time during day hours, as courses are primarily offered in the evening. However, most internships require a day schedule.

9. What is the cost per graduate credit at LIU Post?

The rates per credit for graduate courses may change on a yearly basis.  Visit https://www.liu.edu/enrollment-services/tuition-fees for up to date information.  

10. What type of financial assistance is available for the programs?

Students interested in applying for financial aid should contact Student Financial Services at 516-299-3159.

11. When will I have an advisor?

Mentorship is a vital component of our programs. Upon matriculation into the school counseling or clinical mental health counseling program, each student will be assigned a faculty member who will be a point of contact for academic and related personal and professional development throughout the program. All faculty members are dedicated to getting to know and nurture each student on their journey to becoming a professional school counselor or clinical mental health counselor.

Internship

1. What kind of internship placement is required?

Counseling internship placements are determined by the student’s specialization. Students in the school counseling program must complete supervised internship experiences in approved P-12 school settings to include elementary, middle and high school placements. Students in the clinical mental health counseling program must complete supervised internship experiences that take place in an approved mental health setting. Interns are expected to perform the duties and responsibilities of a counseling practitioner as carried out at that site. Students simultaneously pursuing the CASAC-T credential must complete their internships in OASAS-affiliated internship sites.

2. How many internship hours are required?

School counseling students are required to complete one 100 hour practicum and two 300 hour internships (offered during fall and spring semesters) in an approved supervised P-12 internship setting. Internship hours typically entail three full days per week in a field placement over the course of two semesters. Mental Clinical mental health counselling students also are required to complete one 100 hour practicum and two 300 hour internships (offered during fall, spring and summer semesters) in an approved supervised internship setting. Internship hours typically entail three full days per week in a field placement over the course of two semesters. The opportunity for a third semester of clinical internship (another 300 hours) can be taken by mental health counseling students in lieu of an elective under advisement. Students who complete the additional certification option in CASAC-T (Certificate in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling) as part of their graduate degree program of study will be credited with 4,000 of the 6,000 total hours required for full CASAC certification. 

3. Does LIU help with placement for internships?

Yes. Students in the school counseling and clinical mental health counseling programs receive assistance with practicum and internship placement from the Practicum and Internship Coordinator.  The Coordinator updates and expands the Practicum and Internship Placement Handbook on a regular basis, with sites available across all Five Boroughs, Nassau and Suffolk Counties. The Coordinator also provides active assistance to students needing support in the placement process. Students also can suggest a site to the Placement Coordinator and Chair, Department of Counseling and Development for potential placement upon evaluation of that site.

4. Do you have an onsite training center for student counselors? 

Yes. The Center for Healthy Living serves as a training site for our practicum and internship students enrolled in our clinical mental health counseling program. Students provide direct services to children, adolescents, and adults in the community under the supervision of a licensed mental health counselor.  Students enrolled in the school counseling program must acquire all practicum and internship experiences in P-12 environments.  

Licensure and Certification

1. Will the program prepare me for New York State Licensure as a Clinical Mental Health     

Counselor and New York State Initial Certification as a School Counselor?

Yes. Our 60-credit-program in clinical mental health counseling fulfills the educational requirements for licensure as a Mental Health Counselor established by the New York State Education Department, Office of the Professions.  Our 60-credit program in school counseling fulfills the requirements for initial certification as a professional school counselor established by the New York State Education Department, Office of the Professions

2. Has the National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) changed?

Yes.  The National Clinical Mental Health Counseling Examination (NCMHCE) State Licensing Exam transitioned to a new Content Outline and Exam Format as of November 7, 2022 (or mid-October for those applying for National Certified Counselor (NCC) National Certification). This new format looks very different from the current format. Here are the most significant changes:

A. The new format is a longer exam. According to the NBCC, the new NCMHCE test format will contain 11 case studies. Test takers will be given 225 minutes to complete the exam.

B. Each case study comprises one client narrative (which includes the diagnosis) followed by 13 multiple-choice questions.  Each question offers four answer choices of which only one is correct.

C. Your score will be based on how many correct answers you select. The exam has 143 total questions, but only 100 are scored. The remaining 43 questions are used for 'field testing'.

D. The final date for the current format exam will be October 16 (There will not be any state licensure exams given between October 17, and November 6).

3. Is one format harder than the other?

Over the last year, several professionals examined the sample cases the NBCC has released for the New Format as well as the NBCC's Content Outline. At this point, the conclusion is that it is a tie. Both formats are highly subjective and challenging in different ways. The more significant question for each counselor to answer is 'When do I want to take the exam?' If you want to take it before November 7, study for the Current Format. If you want to take it on November 7, or later, study for the New Format. 

4. Where can I find additional information on the new format?

You can access additional information from the NBCC's website here: www.nbcc.org/exams/ncmhce

5. Where can I find information on what is required prior to registering for the Licensure Examination? 

You can access needed information and required timelines for registration for the licensure examination at https://nbcc.org/Assets/StateForms/NY.pdf

6. Is there a general guide for becoming a licensed clinical mental health counselor?  

Yes.  Guidelines with an accompanying approximate timeline can be found at https://time2track.com/your-guide-to-becoming-a-licensed-mental-health-counselor-in-new-york Students should also always consult the New York State Education Department Website at http://www.op.nysed.gov/ and specifically the site for mental health practitioners http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mhp/ for the most up to date and accurate information.  

7. How do you help students prepare for the New York State Licensing Exam in Clinical Mental Health Counseling?

The material in classes covered over the two and a-half to three years is constructed to provide a comprehensive foundation necessary for preparing to take the licensure exam. Additionally, our program has a relationship with AATBS in which students receive vital study materials for the NCMHCE at substantially reduced costs. Students also are encouraged to form study groups.

8. What if I plan to leave New York State after the program?

Each state has unique licensing laws. Fortunately, New York State has some of the most rigorous and comprehensive requirements, and most states have similar requirements. Students who know they will be re-locating are strongly advised to research individual state laws to make sure they meet the new state's requirements.

9. Does Provisional Certification still exist for school counselors?  

Provisional School Counselor certificates will no longer be issued after February 1, 2023. Individuals must apply and meet all of the requirements for Provisional School Counselor certification by this date. The Provisional Renewal and Permanent School Counselor certificates will continue to be issued until a date determined by the New York State Education Department.

Effective February 2, 2023, individuals can apply for the Initial and Professional School Counselor certificates. The Initial and Professional School Counselor certificates will have different requirements than the Provisional and Permanent School Counselor certificates.

Faculty & Staff

Dr. June Ann Smith
Dr. June Ann Smith, Ph.D., LMHC, LMFT, NCC, LCSW-R, ACS - Associate Professor of Education. Dr. Smith earned her Ph.D. in counseling and human services from Andrews University, Michigan. In addition, she holds an M.S.W. degree from Yeshiva University, New York. She served as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Counseling, Research, Special Education, and Rehabilitation, Hofstra University before coming to LIU Post. In addition, she worked as Director of Educational Services at Grand Street Settlement, a Social Services Agency, on the lower East side, Manhattan, where she worked in collaboration with the Department of Education of New York State and United Way of New York City. Over 10 years in this role, she managed and implement drop out prevention programs in several New York City High Schools in Brooklyn and Manhattan.

Dr. Kathleen Keefe-Cooperman
Kathleen Keefe-Cooperman received an undergraduate degree in psychology from Rhode Island College, a master’s degree in counseling from Pace University, and another master’s degree in the area of clinical practices in psychology from the University of Hartford, where she also received a doctorate in clinical psychology.Dr. Keefe-Cooperman is a licensed New York State Psychologist who is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Counseling and Development.  She first taught as an adjunct for LIU at the West Point site before becoming director for the counseling programs at the Rockland Graduate Campus for five years. This professor then moved to the LIU Post campus in 2009. She greatly enjoys being part of the larger campus, and provides supervision for Psy. D. students performing psychological evaluations. Dr. Keefe-Cooperman is active in the fields of counseling and psychology. She is chair for the Diversity Subcommittee for the Teaching of Psychology Division of APA. The psychologist also specializes in the psychological evaluations of children and adolescents.

Dr. Kristin Schaefer-Schiumo
Dr. Kristin Schaefer-Schiumo is a tenured professor in the Department of Counseling and Development at LIU, Post. A proud recipient of Long Island University’s prestigious David Newton Award for Teaching Excellence, she previously taught in Long Island University’s Tactical Officers’ Education Program at the United States Military Academy at West Point and is a former assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Leadership at LIU, Brooklyn. Dr. Schaefer-Schiumo served as the coordinator for coalition enhancement for a $300,000 grant offered through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association (SAMHSA), where she wrote grants contributing to the further funding of a school-based violence prevention initiative. She has had extensive clinical experience working in hospital, community, and university-based settings with child, adolescent, and adult populations.

Dr. Dogukan Ulupinar

Dr. Ulupinar joined LIU in 2021. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Counselor Education and Supervision at the Pennsylvania State University. Before joining LIU, Dr. Ulupinar worked as an Assistant Professor at California State University, Northridge. He also worked as a professional counselor in a variety of different settings including college mental health, community mental health and vocational rehabilitation. He is a Nationally Certified Counselor, and a licensed professional counselor in the state of Pennsylvania. 

His research is situated in counseling outcome studies, with a special focus on collegiate mental health and counselor performance in integrated primary and behavioral healthcare settings. He serves on the editorial board in the International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling. He has taught several core and specialty area courses in counseling including Counseling Theories, Counseling Practicum, Research in Counseling, Diagnostic Issues in Counseling, Field Experience, and Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Dr. Ulupinar currently serves  as a Faculty Advisor to the Chi Sigma Iota, Lambda Iota Upsilon Chapter for the Post campus students

Dr. Kim Tassinari

Dr. Tassinari is Assistant Professor and Program Co-Director of School Counseling at Long Island University. She earned her Ph.D. in Counselor Education from Montclair State University, New Jersey. Before joining LIU, Dr. Tassinari worked as an Assistant Professor at Western Connecticut State University and as a professional counselor in private practice. Dr. Tassinari holds two school counselor certifications, NY and CT and is a LPC in the state of CT. Dr. Tassinari has presented at national conferences primarily on topics related to mental health, caregiving, and grief and loss. She is an active member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES), North Atlantic Region Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (NARACES), the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) and EMDR International Association. She has served as Co-Chair of the Professional Standards Committee of the American Counseling Association and continues to serve at the national level on the Association for Adult Development and Aging (AADA) Middle Adulthood Task Force, a division of ACA. Dr. Tassinari has co-authored two book chapters and is currently working on research that seeks to understand the lived experience of adults who have recently experienced unexpected loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Her areas of speciality include school counseling, grief, loss, and bereavement adustment and trauma counseling. 

Dr. Heather Sands

Heather joins the LIU counseling team from the University of New Mexico (UNM). While teaching at UNM during the 2021-22 academic year, Heather has also been in private practice. Speaking to her clinical background, Heather has practiced therapy for several clinics and agencies across the greater Albuquerque area. A former supervisor once stated, “go where there is a need.” This motto has carried Heather into working with a variety of populations: refugees and migrant peoples (mostly women), homeless mothers, couples, families, at-risk youth, and youth exhibiting problem sexual behaviors. Most specifically, Heather’s clinical background is in Multisystemic Therapy for the families of youth with problem sexual behaviors (MST-PSB). As such, Heather’s clinical experiences, coupled with her research background, largely inform her pedagogical framework in Counselor Education and Supervision. Heather’s research weaves multiple disciplines together, from the social sciences and humanities and into counselor education. This regards her applications of critical theories to counselor education, practice, and theory to support the field in a deeper grasp of social inequality and diversity. Methodologically, Heather is a qualitative researcher. Through her applications of critical theories, she defaults to critical discourse analysis and interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA) with a focus on hermeneutics. At large, Heather’s research interests incorporate critically examining discourses in the counseling and educational fields on identity, sexuality, sexual violence, and trauma. As a lifelong learner, Heather thoroughly enjoys learning through reading and dialogue with colleagues, friends, and students!

Dr. Lindsey Grossman

Dr. Lindsey Grossman received an undergraduate degree in sociology from the University of Florida, a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling from Georgia State University, and a doctorate in counseling and counselor education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Dr. Grossman is a National Certified Counselor (NCC) who holds an associate clinical license in the state of North Carolina. Her clinical experience has focused on crisis stabilization and healing from trauma.  She has worked in various settings, including a public high school, community hospital, college counseling center, and family justice center. Dr. Grossman’s research agenda is centered around counselor self-disclosure, both how counselors-in-training are taught to make self-disclosure decisions and how experienced counselors utilize self-disclosure in practice. She has been published in prominent peer-reviewed journals in the counseling field on the subjects of posttraumatic growth and qualitative research methods in counseling. She has also served as an ad hoc reviewer for The Clinical Supervisor, peer reviewing submitted articles for publication.


Department Secretary
516-299-2244

Miriam (Mimi) McCormack
Clinical Placement Coordinator
Miriam.McCormack@liu.edu

Heather Delano
Academic Counselor-LIU Brentwood 
631-287-8508
Heather.Delano@liu.edu

CONTACT

College of Education, Information, and Technology
post-educate@liu.edu