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Course Descriptions

Advanced Certificate in Homeland Security Management (15 credits)

HMS 500 – Introduction to Homeland Security Management

This introductory course surveys the major policies, practices, concepts and challenges confronting practitioners in the complex field of Homeland Security Management. The course provides an overview of various threats to domestic security from terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, and other related risks and vulnerabilities, examining the government and private sector organizations, strategies, and systems involved in protecting against and responding to these threats. Using a case study approach, the course focuses on the managerial, political, legal and organizational issues related to crisis planning and response, the National Incident Management System, risk assessment and mitigation, communications and technology systems, medical and public health emergencies, and infrastructure protection.
3 credits

Note: This course is part of the core for the Master of Science and required for the Advanced Certificate.

HMS 520 – Constitutional Issues in Homeland Security Management

This course provides students with an overview of the various statutes, case law, and Constitutional issues governing the activities of practitioners involved in the Homeland Security enterprise at the federal, state and local levels. These issues and bodies of law are of critical importance to Homeland Security practitioners and policymakers, and the course considers their important social, ethical, and political implications. The central focus of the course is on the question of how to balance the goals, objectives and activities of effective Homeland Security against the compelling need to preserve and extend fundamental American civil liberties. The course examines the Constitutional and legal framework of the Homeland Security enterprise, discusses specific Constitutional issues and cases as they apply to Homeland Security, and considers the relationship between Homeland Security policies and the preservation of civil liberties. It examines the effectiveness of various court decisions and legislation including the USA PATRIOT Act in preventing and responding to the threat of terrorism as well as their role in shaping the development of Homeland Security agencies, policies, strategies, and infrastructure.
3 credits

Note: This course is part of the core for the Master of Science and required for the Advanced Certificate.

HMS 530 – Domestic and International Terrorism

This course provides an in-depth examination of the threat of terrorism and its impact on the Homeland Security enterprise by exploring the overall phenomena of terrorism as well as the complex motivations, ideologies, goals and tactics of various domestic and international terrorist groups. Cultural, religious and economic influences on terrorism will be considered. Students will analyze these groups in light of historical, contemporary and potential future acts of terrorism in order to refine their knowledge of terrorism prevention, detection, response and investigation. The course focuses upon such topical issues as state terrorism, political terrorism, revolutionary terrorism, religious and apocalyptic violence, weapons of mass destruction, and terrorist tactics and targeting, as well as the practical strategies and approaches of counterterrorism.
3 credits

Note: This course is part of the core for the Master of Science and required for the Advanced Certificate.

HMS 540 – The Intelligence Function in Homeland Security Management

This course acquaints students with the concepts and practices involved in the process of collecting, analyzing and evaluating intelligence and in managing the intelligence function, as well as the influence of intelligence in shaping homeland security decision-making at the federal, state and local levels. It examines the structures, roles, and interactions of the foreign and domestic intelligence communities, the intelligence gathering and analysis capabilities of criminal justice and private sector entities, and the use of intelligence processes to support homeland security investigations, planning, and policy formulation. Based in a case study approach, students in this course will develop an understanding of intelligence tradecraft and the analytic and research skills used in intelligence work, as well as an appreciation for the ethical, Constitutional, and civil liberties issues involved. Specific topics considered include open source intelligence, assessing the reliability and validity of information, intelligence sharing, covert and counterintelligence operations, Homeland Security managers as both producers and consumers of intelligence, and the future of homeland security intelligence.
3 credits

Note: This course is part of the core for the Master of Science and required for the Advanced Certificate.

HMS 550 – Homeland Security and the Private Sector

This course explores the relationships and interactions between various private-sector institutions and public-sector Homeland Security organizations at the federal, state and local levels. It examines the specific roles, responsibilities, and vulnerabilities of private-sector entities in protecting critical infrastructure as well as in preventing, deterring, and responding to crises. Among the institutions and organizations considered are public utilities, the private security industry, mental health workers, hospitals and biomedical facilities, the public health sector, chemical and hazardous materials companies, shipping and transportation companies, airlines and airports, the financial services industry, and information technology and telecommunications companies. Particular emphasis is paid to mitigating and managing the threat of nuclear, biological, chemical and radiological (NBCR) weapons.
3 credits

Note: This course is part of the core for the Master of Science and required for the Advanced Certificate.