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Course Descriptions

Course descriptions for winter 2012-2013.

ART

ART 1- (1003); Introduction to the Visual Arts; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

Introduction to the visual arts, emphasizing perception and understanding of painting, sculpture, architecture, and the graphic arts and their relationship to the creative process.
3 credits

ART 5- (1008); Introduction to Basic Drawing; 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.; Staff

Introduction to the practice of drawing as an expressive, descriptive art medium through historic examples and the use of a variety of materials and techniques.
3 credits

ART 31- (1023); Pottery and Ceramic Sculpture 1; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

General study in the methods of structuring clay, hand building, throwing on the potter's wheel and experimental techniques. This course encompasses the entire ceramic process, forming, glazing and firing techniques.
Studio fee: 3 credits

CGPH 16- (1010); Digital Imaging; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

Introduction to digital imaging and its effect on the photographic medium. Course will alternate between lecture/field trips and actual hands-on experience in the studio using Adobe Photoshop.
Prerequisite: Art 4 or permission of instructor. 3 credits

CGPH 601- (1011); Graduate Computer Graphics; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff (Graduate)

Digital Paint is intended to provide students with advanced knowledge and expertise in the creation of digital artwork. Students have their own computer workstations and access to color scanners and printers.
3 credits

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRJ 20 – (1035); Critical Issues in Criminal Justice; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; 1/3-1/6; Dr. Harvey Kushner

This course reviews contemporary issues in criminal justice. Issues such as court administration, fourth and fifth amendment rights, issues of due process, use of insanity plea, American women and crime, comparative studies in delinquency prevention, capital punishment, crime trends, sentence disparity, alternatives to incarceration, parole and probation, racism in the criminal justice system, etc. are included.
3 credits

CRJ 675 – (1034); Critical Issues in Criminal Justice; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; 1/3-1/6; Dr. Harvey Kushner

This course reviews contemporary issues in criminal justice. Issues such as court administration, fourth and fifth amendment rights, issues of due process, use of insanity plea, American women and crime, comparative studies in delinquency prevention, capital punishment, crime trends, sentence disparity, alternatives to incarceration, parole and probation, racism in the criminal justice system, etc. are included.
3 credits

CRJ 60- (1026); Terrorism; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; 12/26-12/31; Dr. Harvey Kushner

This course is a survey of terrorism within the United States. Topics include the threat of domestic and international terrorism, terrorist groups, and counterterrorism strategies, among other related topics.
3 credits

CRJ 760- (1027); Terrorism; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; 12/26-12/31; Dr. Harvey Kushner (Graduate)

This course is a survey of terrorism within the United States. Topics include the threat of domestic and international terrorism, terrorist groups, and counterterrorism strategies, among other related topics.
3 credits

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ECONOMICS

ECO 11- (1035); Introduction to Macroeconomics; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

This course discusses the important economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and questions. Its main focus is on analyzing the behavior of important economic aggregates such as national income, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates, and economic growth. The effects of the government's monetary and fiscal policies on economic growth and inflation are also examined.
3 credits

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EDUCATION

EDI 601- (1042); Social Foundations of US Education; Hours Arranged; Dr. Shaireen Rasheed

This course introduces students to the social, economic, political and intellectual foundations of American education. It describes the development of the American school system in a rapidly changing environment, with emphasis on the relationship between education and society. Main topics to be explored are the structure and purposes of schooling, the professionalization of teaching, educational policy making and school social factors influencing teaching and learning, and the relationship between education and work. Class discussions are based upon both primary and secondary sources. The use of the technology as it relates to teaching and learning will be examined. This course will require a writing component. Also, 10 hours of fieldwork will be required.
3 credits

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ENGLISH

ENG 2- (1005); Composition: Argument and Analysis; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Staff-WRITING ACROSS THE CURRICULUM COURSE

A course in analysis and argumentation, focusing on theoretic and stylistic techniques. Utilizing the text, students will write essays of analysis, interpretation, evaluation, and persuasion, culminating in a major library research project.
3 credits

ENG 7- (1004); Western Literature to the Renaissance; 1:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m.; Staff

Great works of Western literature from the Biblical and Greek heritage through writers such as Dante, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes and Milton. Not open to students with credit for ENG 303. Students who complete ENG 7 and ENG 8 fulfill the core requirements in literature and language.
3 credits

ENG 8- (1007); Western Literature: Enlightenment to Modern; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

Course introduces the literary masterworks of such writers as Voltaire, Wordsworth, Goethe, Melville, Dostoevsky and Yeats. Not open to students with credit for ENG 304. Students who complete ENG 7 and ENG 8 fulfill the core requirements in literature and language.
3 credits

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HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

HIM 104C- (1013); Directed Practicum; Hours Arranged; Staff

This is a supervised learning experience to develop understanding, skill and insight into medical procedures; develop awareness of the confidential nature of information given by the patient to the physician; and to observe interaction among departments.
2 credits

HIM 106C- (1014); Directed Practicum; Hours Arranged; Staff

This course is a supervised learning experience to develop skill and insight in classifying diseases and operations and in the use of various systems of classification.
2 credits

HIM 212C- (1015); Directed Practicum; Hours Arranged; Staff

The directed practicum consists of supervised learning experience in the areas taught in HIM 109 and HIM 212.
2 credits

HIM 213C- (1016); Directed Practicum; Hours Arranged; Staff

Practical applications of concepts learned in the didactic setting are provided in a supervised learning experience.
3 credits

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HISTORY

HIS 3- (1033); American Civilization 1607-1877; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

A survey of major political, social, economic, and cultural changes in the area that is now the United States from initial colonization through the end of Reconstruction.
3 credits

HIS 4- (1018); American Civilization Since 1877; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

A general survey of political, social, economic and cultural changes in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present.
3 credits

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INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA

IMA 702- (1012); Advanced Digital Editing; 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.; Staff (Graduate)

This course is a workshop in the digital editing of motion pictures and sound. Beginning with a history of conceptual developments in the theory and practice of editing, students proceed to explore and implement editing techniques through exercises in rhythm, pacing, continuity, montage, psychological vs. real-time, induced vs. real-movement, cutting dialogue, interview scenes, splitting tracks, mixing music and effects, dissolves, wipes and digital transitions.
3 credits

 

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LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

LIS 626- (1029); Teaching Methodologies for School Media Specialists; 1/7-1/11; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Staff (Graduate)

This course will present teaching strategies important for the school media specialist in the school library information center "classroom." Learn and practice techniques for using the school information center as a vital part of the instruction occurring within the school. Lesson planning, questioning strategies, and hands-on practice with important educational trends are integral components of this course.
3 credits.

 

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MEDIA ARTS

CMA 9- (1020); Introduction to Media Arts; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

Overview of the role of mass media in our society and culture. Covers each major mass medium from the book to the internet. For non-majors only. Satisfies the core curriculum arts requirement.
3 credits

CMA 40- (1032); Topics in Media Arts; 1:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m.; Staff

This course covers varied topics of current interest in communications, dealing with theoretical, social, technical and cultural aspects of media. Subjects to be determined each semester.
3 credits

CMA 90- (1044); Careers in Communications; 1:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m.; Dr. Jennifer Cusumano

This seminar for upper level students explores career opportunities in the media professions and the student’s personal career interests and academic choices. The goal is to assist the student in developing appropriate career choices. Prerequisite of a Media Arts Screening is required.
3 credits

MUSIC

MUS 1- (1002); Introduction to Musical Concepts; 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.; Staff

Study of music, and its aesthetic and creative applications in Western civilization.
3 credits

PHILOSOPHY

PHI 8- (1009); Beginning Philosophy; 1:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m.; Staff

This course is an introductory exploration of basic issues raised by the greatest philosophers. Reading focuses on questions about human nature, God, knowledge, values, meaning and purpose.
3 credits

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HE 205- (1021); Substance Abuse; 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.; Staff

This course is an examination of the uses of prescription, over-the-counter and consciousness-altering drugs in contemporary America. Emphasis is placed on making improved health-related decisions when confronted by substance use. A non-judgmental approach is used to encourage students to discuss their experiences, attitudes and values related to drug usage.
3 credits *May be taken and recognized as Liberal Arts credit

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

POL 1 (1007); Introduction to Political Science I; 5:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.; Professor Mel Laucella

Analysis of the nature of the state, political power, law sovereignty and political ideologies. Must be taken by all Political Science majors.
3 credits

POL 2 (1022); Introduction to Political Science II; 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.; Dr. Michael Soupios

Constitutional structure, major functions and operations of the national government. Must be taken by all Political Science majors.
3 credits

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PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 41- (1019); Psychology of Humor; 1:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m..; Staff

This course explores the theories, research methods and literature of scientifically assessing the factors and processes underlying the human experience of being able to appreciate humor and being funny. Using this information, we will review humor applications in the domains of education, relationships (ex. parent-child, spouses), therapy and Self/personal development. Prerequisites: A basic science course (or Introductory Psychology) is required OR signed permission of the Professor. A class in Philosophy of Humor or Humor in Literature (or other Arts) or Drama class about humor is valuable for background.
3 credits.

PSY 41- (1017); Psychology of Pets and People; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

This course examines the physical, psychological and social aspects of people and their relationships with their pets. We will explore the evolution of the domestication of animals as pets and historical changes that have altered how humans perceive this human-non-human relationship. Theories, designed to explain the causes and processes underlying the pets-and-people relationship, will be reviewed as well as scientific methods of assessment and research findings on the positive and negative issues of pet ownership for health, psychological and social wellbeing of both pets and animals. Requirements include: (a) a group research project (students will analyze internet research data gathered from Website volunteers from the Fall Term 2009), to develop some basic skills in this application of the scientific method; (b) a self-analysis of their own pet preferences, attitudes, beliefs and practices (based upon their history with pets, behavioral observations of their voluntary interactions with pets, results from surveys on attitudes and beliefs about pets used in present day research); and (c) a 3 page APA style Q & A format library research paper on a topic related to the pets x people relationship of personal/professional interest (ex. gender differences in pet interactions or attitudes, grieving the loss of a pet, personality factors in pet selection, pet training practices, pet-assisted therapy with various categories of syndromes and populations, liabilities of pet ownership, pets and the economic recession, robotic pets and possibilities). Prerequisites: A basic science course (or Introductory Psychology) is recommended as well as Psych 65 Animal Learning and Cognition (or a similar human/animal comparative course) or Animals and Anthropology course.
3 credits.

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SOCIOLOGY

SOC 1- (1024); Introduction to Sociology; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

This course covers nature and the organization of human society, socialization, culture and social interaction. Meets Core Curriculum requirement when combined with SOC 2.
3 credits

SOC 98- (1025); America: Visions and Critiques; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Staff

This course will exam ideological viewpoints in America today and will look at the relationship of cultural, economic and political factors in their development. We will view documentaries and films that illustrate these viewpoints.
3 credits.

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SPEND JANUARY STUDYING IN THE TROPICS

PSY 99- Undergraduate (1025); PSY 324- Honors; Field Study of Wild Dolphin Social Behavior (Manzanillo, Costa Rica); 1/3-1/20/2013; Dr. Paul Forestell

This course takes place on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, and involves daily observation of social interactions between two species of dolphins (bottlenose and tucuxi). Focus of the study is to identify individual dolphins based on unique dorsal fin markings, and to understand the social basis of inter-species mating that has been observed. Students will document feeding activity, courting and reproductive displays, aggressive encounters and other social interactions.
3 credits. Travel courses subject to special fees and reduced tuition rates

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