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Course Schedule and Descriptions

SUMMER COLLEGE 2014

SUMMER SESSION II: JUNE 23-JULY 25

ANT 1 DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN SPECIES, CULTURE & SOCIETY (CLASS #2543)

This course presents students with the evidence of human evolution, the relation between human beings and other primates and facts of human variation. It traces cultural evolution from hunting and gathering societies of the Paleolithic to the emergence of farming, cities, states and civilizations of the Neolithic. Meets Core Curriculum requirements when combined with ANT 2.
Faculty: Chantal Ferraro
Department of Sociology & Anthropology
June 23- July 25
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

ENG 1 COMPOSITION (CLASS # 2541)

English 1 is an introductory writing course that uses interpretation and analysis of texts to promote clear thinking and effective prose. Students learn the conventions of academic writing. In addition, students learn how to adapt writing for various audiences and rhetorical situations. This course is required of all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit or successful achievement on the SAT examination in writing.
Faculty: Steven Williams
Department of English
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

MTH 1 INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE MATH

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of contemporary mathematics with topics selected from: sets and logic, numbers theory, geometry, graph theory, topology, probability, combinatorics, algebraic structures, consumer finance, and linear programming.
FACULTY: Shahla Ahdout
Department of Mathematics
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-9:55 a.m.

POL 1 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 1 (CLASS # 1187)

This Course is an analysis of the nature of the state, political power, law sovereignty and political ideologies. The stress is on analysis of contemporary concepts.
Department of History and Political Science
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 4 p.m.-5:50 p.m.

POL 2 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 2 (CLASS # 1049)

This course introduces the study of the Constitutional structure, major functions and operations of the national government.
Faculty: Michael Soupios
Department of History and Political Science
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 6 p.m.-7:50 p.m.

HIS 3 AMERICAN CIVILIZATION to 1877 (CLASS # 1327)

A survey of major political, social, economic, and cultural changes in the area that is now the United States from initial colonization through the end of Reconstruction.
Faculty: Adam Charboneau
Department of History
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m.-9:55 a.m.

HIS 4 AMERICAN CIVILIZATION SINCE 1877 (CLASS # 1051)

A general survey of political, economic, social and cultural changes in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Examines the emergence of America as a world power by the turn of the 20th century and its position as world's only superpower by the end of the end of century. Topics include: growth of diverse, urban society, the struggles of those seeking quality and inclusion in quest for the "American Dream," the emergence of mass society, U.S. and the two world wars, the Cold War, and the use of U.S. military power.
Faculty: Adam Charboneau
Department of History
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

PHI 8 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (CLASS # 1051)

This course is an introductory exploration of basic issues raised by the great philosophers. Readings focus on questions about human nature, God, knowledge, values, meaning and purpose.
Faculty: Mark Mendell
Department of Philosophy
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

PHI 8 INTRODUCTION PHILOSOPHY (CLASS # 2532)

This course is an introductory exploration of basic issues raised by the great philosophers. Readings focus on questions about human nature, God, knowledge, values, meaning and purpose.
Faculty: Mark Mendell
Department of Philosophy
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 12:10 p.m.-2:05 p.m.

ECO 10 INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS (CLASS # 2512)

This course discusses the important economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and issues. Its main focus is on the choices made by consumers, producers, and governments, and their interactions of these choices. Topics include demand and supply, consumption, and production, competitive and non-competitive product markets, markets for resources, and welfare.
Faculty: Panos Mourdoukoutas
Department of Economics
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

ECO 11 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (CLASS # 1022)

This course discusses the important economic theory and concepts that facilitate understating economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and questions. Its main focus is on analyzing the behavior of important economic aggregates such as national income, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and economic growth. The effects of the governments' monetary and fiscal policies on economic growth and inflation are also examined.
Faculty: Panos Mourdoukoutas
Department of Economics
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

PHI 13 ETHICS & SOCIETY (CLASS # 2533)

This course is an introduction to human values that focuses on such ethical, social and aesthetic questions as: What is the basis of right and wrong? How can one gain knowledge of good and evil? How do we judge beauty? What do we mean by justice? What makes life worth living?
Faculty: David Kaye
Department of Philosophy
June 23-July 25
Monday-Thursday, 2:30 p.m.-4:25 p.m.

SUMMER SESSION III: July 28-August 29

ENG 1 COMPOSITION (CLASS # 2515)

English 1 is an introductory writing course that uses interpretation and analysis of texts to promote clear thinking and effective prose. Students learn the conventions of academic writing. In addition, students learn how to adapt writing for various audiences and rhetorical situations. This course is required of all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit or successful achievement on the SAT examination in writing.
Faculty: Amanda Campbell
of English
July 28-August 29
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

SOC 1 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (CLASS # 1666)

This course covers nature and the organization of human society, socialization, culture and social interaction.
Faculty: Heather Parrott
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
July 28-August 29
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m. - 12 p.m.

ENG 2 COMPOSITION: ARGUMENT AND ANALYSIS (CLASS # 1343)

English 2 is a course in analysis and argumentation, focusing on scholarly research and documentation. Building on the work begun in English 1, the course develops knowledge of complex rhetorical and stylistic techniques and culminates in a library research paper.
Faculty: David Shimkin
Department of English
July 28-August 29
Monday-Thursday, 12:10 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

POL 2 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 2 (CLASS # 1012)

This course introduces the study of the Constitutional structure, major functions and operations of the national government.
Faculty: Melchiore Laucella
Department of History and Political Science
July 29-August 30
Monday-Thursday, 4:30 p.m.-6:25 p.m.

HIS 3 AMERICAN CIVILIZATION to 1877 (CLASS # 1017)

A survey of major political, social, economic, and cultural changes in the area that is now the United States from initial colonization through the end of Reconstruction.
Department of History and Political Science
July 28-August 29
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

PHI 8 BEGINNING PHILOSOPHY (CLASS # 1184)

This course is an introductory exploration of basic issues raised by the great philosophers. Readings focus on questions about human nature, God, knowledge, values, meaning and purpose.
Faculty: Edward Miller
Department of Philosophy
July 28-August 29
Monday-Thursday, 10:05 a.m.-12 p.m.

ECO 11 INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS (CLASS # 1213)

This course discusses the important economic theory and concepts that facilitate understating economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and questions. Its main focus is on analyzing the behavior of important economic aggregates such as national income, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and economic growth. The effects of the governments' monetary and fiscal policies on economic growth and inflation are also examined.
Faculty: Dae Lee
Department of Economics
July 28 – August 29
Monday-Thursday, 4:15 p.m.-6:10 p.m.

PHI 13 ETHICS & SOCIETY (CLASS # 2534)

What does it mean to be a good person? What are our ethical obligations to other individuals and to society as a whole? Is there such a thing as moral truth, or is morality relative to individuals or societies? This course is an introduction to ethics, the branch of philosophy that addresses such questions.
Faculty: Edward Miller
Department of Philosophy
July 28-August 29
Monday-Thursday, 2:30 p.m.-4:25 p.m.

PHI 13 ETHICS & SOCIETY (CLASS # 1502)

What does it mean to be a good person? What are our ethical obligations to other individuals and to society as a whole? Is there such a thing as moral truth, or is morality relative to individuals or societies? This course is an introduction to ethics, the branch of philosophy that addresses such questions.
Faculty: Edward Miller
Department of Philosophy
July 28-August 29
Monday-Thursday, 12:10 p.m.-2:05 p.m.