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Course Descriptions

ACC 11 Accounting Principles I

This course presents an introduction to fundamental financial accounting principles, concentrating on identifying, recording, and communicating the economic events of a business organization. This course studies the theory and practice of accounting. Topics covered during the semester include the balance sheet, income statement, and principles required to understand financial accounting systems.
3 credits, Every semester

ACC 12 Accounting Principles II

This course is the second in the accounting principles sequence. The first part of the course focuses on partnerships and the corporate form of business organization, including financial statement analysis and cash flow statements. Students are then introduced to managerial accounting concepts and how they can be used in fostering internal business decision-making. Information concerning the behavior of costs, profit planning, and budgeting is analyzed to enhance meaningful comprehension of managerial accounting. 
Prerequisite of ACC 11 is required.
3 credits, Every semester

ACC 21 External Reporting I

This course focuses on the preparation and analysis of financial information for users external to the organization. Topics include the accounting cycle; income measurement, cash, receivables, inventories, operational assets, investments, and preparation of financial statements. Pronouncements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC are an integral part of the course. 
Prerequisite of ACC 12 is required.
3 credits, Every Fall semester

ACC 22 External Reporting II      

This course is a continuation of ACC 21 External Reporting I. This course is an in-depth study of the underlying concepts, measurement, analysis, and interpretation of financial information for external users. Topics include long-term liabilities, investments, stockholder's equity, earnings per share, leases, pensions, cash flow statements, accounting errors and changes, and deferred income taxes.  Pronouncements of the AICPA, FASB, and SEC are an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite of ACC 21 is required.
3 credits, Every Spring semester

ACC 61 Managerial Cost Analysis

This course provides an in-depth understanding of the theory and concepts underlying conventional cost systems and the rationale for the development and understanding of modern cost management systems including: 1) cost accumulation systems for product costing, cost behavior concepts for planning and control, and activity-based-costing; 2) the use of cost information for strategic decision analysis and support; and 3) financial planning and control systems with a quality management perspective. 
Prerequisite of ACC 21 is required.
3 credits, Every semester

ACC 80 Accounting Information Systems

This course develops an understanding of the roles of accounting information and information technology and their influence on decision making, operational support, and organizational competitiveness. The course will include, but not be limited to, the framework of accounting information systems and decisions that impact on their design and implementation, the role of accounting information systems in transaction processing and internal control, and the functions of the major subsystems. The student will also gain hands-on experience in using and in evaluating accounting information systems, as well as further develop collaborative, oral, and written communication skills. 
Prerequisite of ACC 21 is required.
3 credits, Every semester

ACC 82 Auditing

This course provides an introduction to auditing, including basic concepts, techniques, and audit applications. Course coverage includes the audit risk model, understanding and testing internal controls, substantive testing, fraud, reports on audited financial statements, professional ethics, and an introduction to computer auditing. 
Prerequisites of ACC 22 and ACC 80 are required.
3 credits, Every semester

ACC 84 Tax & Business Strategies

Tax basics of all types of entities will be studied. The course stresses the importance of exposure to a range of tax concepts within the framework of financial reporting. Critical thinking and problem solving skills will be developed utilizing tax planning decision models. Recognition of tax savings and tax hazards will prepare students for many possible work environments. 
Co-requisite of ACC 21 is required.
3 credits, Fall semester

ACC 85 Advanced Taxation

A continuation of ACC 84, this course will review more advanced areas of the Federal tax law as promulgated by the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, including applicable rulings, case law precedent and treasury regulations. The student will become familiar with rules applicable to the taxation of business entities, including C and S corporations, LLCs, partnerships, and specially taxed corporations. An introduction to New York State taxes will be covered. 
Prerequisite of ACC 84 is required.
3 credits, Spring semester

BIO 7 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course covers the structure and function of the human body, including basic biochemistry, cell structure, cell division, cell respiration, tissue composition, genetics, and the nervous and endocrine systems. Laboratory focuses on relevant physiological experiments and histology. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
4 credits, Every Fall and Summer semesters

BIO 8 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This course covers the body's organ systems in detail, including the musculo-skeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, excretory, digestive, and reproductive systems. Relevant dissection, histological studies, and physiology are all featured in the laboratories. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Pre-requisite BIO 7 is required. 
4 credits, Every Spring and Summer semesters

BIO 85 Literacy in the Experimental Sciences

This course introduces students to the special ways of approaching and utilizing texts characteristic of the experimental sciences. Students will learn to critically interpret readings, quantitative data including graphical and statistical charts and tables as well as learning to present material in a variety of documentation styles used in the sciences. Through an emergent understanding of the unifying concepts underlying the scientific approach, students will actively pursue communication of the conceptual systems involved and the pedagogical integration of these into their boarder approaches to science and its meaningful communication. This course provides an overview of how knowledge is acquired and presented in the laboratory sciences. Same as CHM 86 and ERS 85.
3 credits, Annually

BIO 103 General Biology I

Processes fundamental to all living things such as energy utilization, growth, development, and reproduction will be examined from the perspective of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. The goal will be a comprehension of the functioning of the living organism as embedded in the integration of these fundamental biological mechanisms. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
4 credits, Every Fall and Spring semesters

BIO 104 General Biology II

This course introduces patterns and processes of organisms and groups of organisms with emphasis on their origin, evolution, and the relationships among them and their environments. Topics include evolution, population genetics, systematics, animal behavior and ecology. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Pre-requisite BIO 103 is required.
Pre-requisite of not having taken BIO 1S or BIO 4 is required.
4 credits, Every Fall and Spring semesters

BMS 40 Computer Applications

This course reviews the usefulness of computers for home or business. Students learn the current Microsoft Office Programs (Word, Excel, Power Point, and Access) and the utilization of an online course management system (i.e. Blackboard or WebCT). Extensive "hands-on" computer use is involved for the completion of this course.
3 credits, Fall semester

BMS 90 Microbiology in Health Sciences

This course is required for all medical biology majors and health related majors including those students seeking graduate study in the biological sciences and those seeking admission into professional schools. The course introduces the principles of clinical microbiology and characteristics of microorganisms, host-parasite relationships, resistance, immunity, hypersensitivity, public health, epidemiology as well as applied, medical and industrial microbiology; includes clinical diagnostic methods such as culture, control, identification, sterilization, microbiological techniques and concepts; emphasizes those techniques specifically employed in the clinical microbiological laboratory.
4 credits, Fall and Spring semesters

BMS 225 Histopathology of Body Systems

The student comprehends the magnitude of changes that occur in diseased cells and tissues of the human body that are diseased. Emphasis is on major changes observed in tissues undergoing pathologic processes such as: Inflammation, degenerations, necrosis, growth disorders; those changes that occur that influence the health and function of normal tissues within various body systems. Examination of pathology slides is an essential course requirement.
Prerequisites: Bio 7 and 8.
3 credits, Every Fall semester

CHM 3 Principles of Chemistry I

This course is the first part of two-semester sequence that includes the study of the nature of matter and energy, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, atomic structure and chemical bonding. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Pre-requisite MTH 3 or Co-requisite MTH 7 or MTH 8 is required.
4 credits, Every Fall, Spring and Summer

CHM 4 Principles of Chemistry II

This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence that includes the study of colligative properties, kinetics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory.
Prerequisite of CHM 3 is required.
4 credits, Every Fall, Spring and Summer

CHM 21 Organic Chemistry I

This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence that includes the study of nomenclature, structure, bonding, reactions, and syntheses of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes, and the corresponding cyclic compounds. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory.
Prerequisite of CHM 4 is required.
4 credits, Every Fall and Summer

CHM 22 Organic Chemistry II

This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence that includes the study of the spectroscopy, structure, reactions, and synthesis of aromatic compounds, alcohols, ethers, carboxylic acids, amines and related compounds. Three hours lecture, four hours laboratory.
Prerequisite of CHM 21 is required.
4 credits, Every Spring and Summer

FIN 11 Corporation Finance 

This course covers basic principles by which the modern corporation manages its assets, controls its liabilities and raises new capital. Topics covered include the mathematics of finance, valuation and rates of return on securities, financial statement analysis, forecasting, planning and budgeting, working capital management, introduction to capital budgeting techniques, and cost of capital considerations.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite of ACC 11 is required.
3 credits, Every semester

HAD 10 American Health Systems

This course is a survey of the American health care system that examines the elements related to the organization, delivery, financing and planning of health services.
3 credits, Every semester

HPA 14 Financial Management in Health Care/Public Administration

A survey of the principles and practices of financial management theory and its applications to health care and public administration. The course will focus on budgeting and cost control, cost reimbursement, taxation and revenue, cost incentive programs and financial analysis specific to the health care and public sectors.
Prerequisite of HAD 10 is required.
3 credits, Alternate years.

HPA 15 Health Resource Allocation in Health Care/Public Sector

The course focuses on the application of special problems involving health and public resources, allocation, markets, personnel shortages, as well as issues relating to the equity and stabilization of the public/health sector.
Prerequisite of HAD 10 is required.
3 credits, Annually

HPA 18 Research Methods

An overview of the scientific method as it applies to research in fields of health care and public administration. Special attention will be devoted to examining issues related to cost effectiveness and alternatives. Open to all non-majors without prerequisite.
3 credits, Every semester

HPA 20 Computer-Based Management Systems

This course is a comprehensive review of computer concepts and usage in health and public sectors. It covers the types of computers which are appropriate and the storage devices needed. Students learn to create programs, and to evaluate packaged software for its applicability to their department's needs. The course involves extensive "hands-on" computer use.
Prerequisite of HAD 10 is required.
3 credits, Every semest
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HPA 30 Critical Issues in Health/Public Administration

Multidisciplinary seminar focusing on sociological, political and economic issues of health care and public administration. Selected issues will be determined by recent developments in the organization and delivery of health care and public services.
Prerequisite of HAD 10 is required.
3 credits, On Occasion

HSC 101 Introduction to Health Professions

This course will provide an introduction to various professions in the health care field. Students will be exposed to an overview of health care systems and major aspects of health care delivery. Students will understand health care priorities on the national and local level. Various health careers will be reviewed with a goal to understand underlying qualities and characteristics of health professions and professional behavior, related values, interests and ethics. In addition, students can begin to explore health career options based on an understanding of professional tasks, skills, tools and technology, abilities, work activities, work context/environment and educational, training and legal requirements. In addition, the course will provide an introduction to medical terminology, as well as library skills. Students will also be required to create a professional resume that may be used for future opportunities.
3 credits, Fall and Spring Semesters

LAW13 Legal Environment of Business

This course examines the origins of law, business ethics, court system, business related torts, contracts, agency, partnership, corporations, employment law, intellectual property, and international business law. 
3 credits, Every semester

MAN 11 Principles of Management

This course introduces the student to management history, concepts, theories and practices. The managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling are examined. 
3 credits, Every semester

MAN 12 Organizational Behavior

This course focuses on human behavior within organizations, including such topics as: motivation, communication, leadership, formal and informal organizations, implementing change, and organizational development.
Prerequisite of MAN 11 is required.
3 credits, Every semester

MKT 11 Marketing Principles and Practices

This is the core-marketing course for the Long Island University Undergraduate Program and it also appeals to non-business-majors who are interested in marketing. The aim of the course is to provide a rigorous and comprehensive introduction to contemporary marketing practice. The participants learn how to analyze complex business situations, identify underlying problems and decide on courses of actions with the help of the modern marketing management techniques. The students learn the concepts and terminology of modern marketing management during lectures, cases and class discussions. Application of the marketing management concepts becomes the focus for the term project.
3 Credits, Every Semester

MTH 19 Basic Statistics

This course is directed toward understanding and interpreting numerical data. Topics covered include: descriptive statistics, regression, correlation, sampling techniques and elements of inferential statistics. Cannot be taken for credit by any student who has completed or is currently taking MTH 23, MTH 41/BIO 141 or MTH 8.
3 credits, Annually

MTH 41 Biostatistics

This course covers the fundamental principles of data organization, inferential statistics and correlation analysis with specific reference to their uses in biological and medical research. Cannot be taken for credit by any student who has completed or is currently taking MTH 19 or 23. Same as BIO 141. Not open to students who have taken MTH 19 or 23.
3 credits, Every Fall

NTR 10 Nutrition

In this course, students learn about the role of nutrition in improving health and applying these ideas to developing a healthy eating pattern. They will understand how food choices and physical activity contribute to total well-being. Open to Non-Majors only.
3 credits, Every Fall semester

NUR 99 Pathophysiology

A systematic survey of disease within systems is developed in a logical manner that includes etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and outcomes and evaluation of treatment for each disease.
Fall semester, 3 credits

PHI 13 Human Values

This course is an introduction to human values that focuses on such ethical, social and aesthetic questions as: What is the basis of right and wrong? How can one gain knowledge of good and evil? How do we judge beauty? What do we mean by justice? What makes life worth living?
3 credits, Every Fall, Spring and Summer

PHI 19 Medical Ethics

This course will explore philosophical issues raised by modern medical technology and practice, such as: experiments on humans and animals; genetic engineering; transplants; the responsibility of the hospital to the community; decisions about who gets limited medical resources; the issues surrounding AIDS; mental illness and behavior control; patient rights, including the right to the truth.
3 credits, Fall and spring semesters

PHY 3 University Physics I

Physics 3 is the first half of an introductory, calculus-based, physics course for science and mathematics majors, covering the laws and principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
A prerequisite of MTH 7 is required.
4 credits Every Fall, Spring and Summer

PHY 4 University Physics II

Physics 4 is the second half of an introductory, calculus-based physics course for science and mathematics majors. It is concerned with the laws and principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics, and includes an introduction to modern physics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory.
Prerequisites of PHY 3 and MTH 7 and co-requisite of MTH 8 are required.
4 credits Every Fall, Spring and Summer

POL 83 Policy-Making in American Government

This course studies the emphasis on policy-making at different levels of national, state, and local government. It includes an analysis of relationships of political inputs to policy outputs; evolution of the results of the policy process; relationship to the democratic process and the limitations.
3 credits On Occasion

PSY 25 Developmental Psychology: Childhood

Behavior and development during childhood is covered. The emphasis, in this course, is on normal physical, intellectual, emotional, and social growth and development. Not open to students who have taken EDI 15. Prerequisite of PSY 2 or 4 or the permission of the instructor is required.
3 credits Every Fall and Spring

PSY 26 Developmental Psychology: Adolescence

Behavior and development during adolescence is covered. The emphasis, in this course, is on normal physical, intellectual, emotional, and social growth and development. Not open to students who have taken EDI 15.
Pre-requisite of PSY 2 or 4 is required.
3 credits Fall and Spring

PSY 70 Developmental Psychology: Adulthood and Aging

This course covers understanding adult life, growing old in contemporary society and experiencing changes in body, ability and personality. Prerequisite of PSY 25 or 26 are required.
3 credits Annually

SOC 1 Introduction to Sociology

This course covers nature and the organization of human society, socialization, culture and social interaction. Meets Core Curriculum requirement when combined with SOC 2.
3 credits Every Fall, Spring and Summer

SPE 5 Voice and Diction

Communication is part of every aspect of our lives. In this course, students will explore the nature of a wide variety of communication forms and will acquire the skills to 1) formulate more effective verbal and non-verbal messages, 2) communicate more effectively in interpersonal relationships, 3) listen actively, and 4) manage interpersonal conflict. Students will also, learn to communicate more effectively during interviews and to construct and deliver effective public speeches.
3 credits Every Fall and Spring