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Course Descriptions

BMS 544 CLS Review Seminar

This course is designed to provide senior CLS students with the appropriate experiences in answering ASCP and NCA certification examination questions and in case study analysis. Review questions in the major categories of hematology, chemistry, immunology, immunohematology (blood bank), and microbiology are addressed. The review sessions are team-taught by program faculty. The seminar culminates in a mock exam which contributes to the determination of the final grade for the course.
3 credits

BMS 547 Management, Supervision, Teaching and Professionalism Seminar

This seminar identifies the five components of Management in Laboratory Medicine: duties and responsibilities including “problem solving-decision making” processes; concepts of managerial leadership: communication skills; process of personnel administration: evaluation of employee performance; effective laboratory operations and principles of laboratory finance: cost containment. Additionally, information on teaching, professionalism, supervision, regulatory agency requirements, laboratory information systems, and the importance of continuing medical education are discussed. Case study assignments reflect typical laboratory problems encountered. Teaching principles include writing of objectives and educational methodology.
Spring, 2 credits

BMS 551 Clinical Chemistry I and Urinalysis

This course introduces students to safety principles, quality control and laboratory math and the analysis, quantitation, the serum and urine specimen. Emphasis is based on the clinical correlations and analytical procedures commonly performed on serum to determine the quantity of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, and non-protein nitrogen substances and to assess cardiac, liver, renal, pancreatic and gastrointestinal function. Analysis of the physical, chemical and microscopic examination of urine (urinalysis) is also presented along with the disease processes that hinder kidney function.
Spring, 3 credits

BMS 562 Theories of Blood Coagulation

This course covers the theoretical aspects of blood coagulation in normal and disease states, including laboratory methods which demonstrate various blood factors.
Fall, 3 credits

BMS 563 Hematology and Body Fluids

The formed elements of the peripheral blood, their precursors, function and structure – including basic methodologies for quantitation of cells and cellular components – are discussed. Normal and abnormal cellular morphologies, their clinical relevance in both the quantitative and qualitative assessment of disease in blood is also emphasized. Other body fluids are also addresses: cerebrospinal, synovial, pericardial, peritoneal, pleural, amniotic fluids and seminal fluid in terms of normal and abnormal findings, methods of collection and assessment.
Fall, 3 credits

BMS 585 Immunohematology

This course addresses the many aspects associated with transfusion medicine. Lecture and laboratory coursework are incorporated to address the theoretical aspects of Immunohematology supported by a technical emphasis on laboratory procedures performed in a hospital transfusion service.
Prerequisite BMS 563 and BMS 587 or Permission of Instructor.
Fall, 3 credits

BMS 587 Clinical Immunology

In addition to reviewing the cells and tissues of the immune system, specific and non-specific mechanisms of the immune response, the major histo-compatibility complex, hypersensitivities and tumor surveillance of the immune system, this course emphasizes immunologic techniques in the serologic identification of antigens and antibodies. Emphasis is made on measurement of the immune product or reaction which can yield significant information in the clinical differential diagnosis or monitoring the progress of a disorder / disease.
Prerequisite course in Immunology is required.
Spring, 3 credits

BMS 591 Medical Microbiology

This course serves three purposes: (1) as a “refresher” course to those who are in the field; (2) as a prerequisite for further study in microbiology; and (3) as preparation for professional board examinations. The delineation of microbial species: bacteria, fungi, algae, viruses, rickettsiae, chlamydia, protozoa, helminths and other animal parasites implicated in disease are presented. The course covers methods used in diagnostic microbiology as well as medical, clinical, epidemiological and nosocomial aspects of microbial disease states. Additionally, computerization, instrumentation, miniaturization, and DNA recombinant studies applicable to microbiology are covered.
Fall, 3 credits

BMS 609 Laboratory Information Systems

This course describes the selection and evaluation of Laboratory Information Systems (LIS) to coordinate and interface departments of Clinical and Anatomical Pathology in the hospital setting. Problems concerning needs analysis, cost, value of the system and communication through computer technology are addressed. The usefulness of computer operations in charting, graphing, database analysis and on-line Internet services is also presented. Students identify criteria to be considered to evaluate the success of LIS systems, quality management and their competency.
Prerequisite coursework in Computers is required.
Spring, 3 credits

BMS 610 Histopathology

This course will teach the student the histologic and cellular composition of tissues in different disease states as compared to normal tissue. Emphasis is on major changes observed in tissues undergoing pathologic processes such as: inflammation, degenerations, necrosis, growth disorders; those changes that occur that influence the health and function of normal tissues within various body systems. Examination of pathology slides is an essential course requirement.
Fall, 3 credits

BMS 647 Quality Management for the Clinical Laboratory

This course addresses the implementation of quality improvement principles for the Clinical Laboratory. It begins with a discussion of the rational about continuous quality improvement, the group or teamwork approach to quality improvement, and the process of formulating flowcharts, matrices and quality control charts to analyze and quantitate quality improvements measures. It ends by discussing and responding to actual case situations by utilizing clinical practice guideline that help to understand the nature of disease processes and outcomes of early interventions.
Spring, 3 credits

BMS 652 Clinical Chemistry II & Instrumentation

This is an advanced course designed to provide in-depth understanding of the medical approach to evaluating disorders. Several topics are presented for review, analysis and discussion. This course also has a laboratory component which provides further emphasis about medically significant analytes.
Prerequisite of BMS 551 is required.
Fall, 3 credits

BMS 656 Molecular Diagnostics

Molecular diagnostics is the application of methods in biotechnology to the diagnosis of disease. Biotechnology involves techniques used in molecular biology as applied to the study of cell function at the DNA/RNA level. This course surveys some of the standard techniques used in biotechnology: cell culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry, cloning, and probe synthesis. Formal lectures are followed by experiments in a laboratory equipped to perform some of the aforementioned techniques. Most of these techniques represent transferable technologies that may be used in various fields; i.e., forensic pathology, clinical laboratory medicine and cancer screening.
Fall and Spring, 3 credits

BMS 703 Research Methods

This is a course designed to provide practical tools for initiation and development of a research proposal. The scientific approaches to problem-solving, data collection and analysis are discussed.
Fall, Spring, and Summer, 3 credits

BMS 704 Clinical Research Thesis

This course is a clinical research project designed to develop and enhance research skills appropriate to the area of specialization chosen for the M.S. degree. The research data is obtained from a health care facility, academic setting, business or industry, community program or clinical research facility. The collected data is analyzed and a thesis is written and presented to the department. Open only to matriculated students with approval by department chairperson, Graduate Committee and mentor.
Prerequisite of BMS 703 is required.
Every Semester, 3 credits

BMS 706 Research Project & Comp Exam

This course provides another option for successful completion of the M.S. degree in Medical Biology through the completion of a research project and a comprehensive examination in the specialty. Open only to matriculated students with approval by department chairperson, Graduate Committee and mentor.
Prerequisite of BMS 703 is required.
Every Semester, 3 credits

BMS 708 Experimental Research Thesis

For experimental theses, the model system may be animals, tissue cells or microbial agents. The topic selection for experimental thesis is generally decided by the mentor. The student (with the help of the mentor) has to have logically defined objectives and a clear hypothesis. In this course the student has to carry out the experiments, review relevant literature, collect all research data, formulate graphs, figures or tables and write the results, discussion, summary, conclusions and defend the thesis with a PowerPoint presentation.
Prerequisite of BMS 703 is required.
Every semester, 3 credits

BMS 759 Practicum in Clinical Chemistry/Urinalysis

The student will work with assigned preceptors at assigned clinical sites learning the techniques, procedures, instrumentation, and rational of routine and special chemistry tests. The rationale of clinical significance will be addressed. 40 hour week for 6 weeks = 240 hours. Routine urinalysis will be instructed for one week; special chemistry involving esoteric chemistry methodologies for one week. Enrollment Requirement: minimum GPA 3.0 in didactic courses in the program and successful interview. Program director permission required.
Spring, 3 credits

BMS 769 Practicum in Hematology, Coagulation, Histotechniques

The students will work with assigned preceptors at assigned clinical sites to learn to perform and to troubleshoot with instrumentation routine and specialized tests in hematology and coagulation. The rationale of clinical significance will be addressed. Students will learn to perform techniques in the histology department. 40 hour week for 6 weeks = 240 hours. Special Hematology for one week and Coagulation for one week. Enrollment Requirement: minimum GPA 3.0 in didactic courses in the program and successful interview. Program director permission required.
Spring, 3 credits

BMS 789 Practicum in Immunohematology/ Clinical Immunology

The students will work with assigned preceptors at the assigned clinical site learning routine and advanced techniques of blood banking procedures and techniques. All aspects of transfusion medicine will be addressed. Two weeks will be dedicated to the clinical immunology lab learning various molecular and immunological procedures and their associated clinical significance. 40 hour week for 6 weeks = 240 hours. Enrollment Requirement: minimum GPA 3.0 in didactic courses in the program and successful interview. Program director permission required.
Spring, 3 credits

BMS 799 Practicum in Microbiology

The student will learn under the direction of preceptors at the assigned clinical sites to isolate, culture and identify bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens. 40 hour week for 6 weeks = 240 hours. Enrollment Requirement: minimum GPA 3.0 in didactic courses in the program and successful interview. Program director permission required.
Spring, 3 credits