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Course Descriptions

SWK 601 Policy I: History and Philosophy of Social Work, Social Welfare Policy and Services

This introductory policy class provides information about the development of social work as a profession; historical and contemporary social welfare policies, services and institutions; and examines how economic, political, and organizational systems influence how services are created and provided. These themes are discussed within a context of social issues and connect social welfare policy and social work practice. Students will gain historical and contemporary knowledge of the various forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and their relationship to social and economic justice for society in general and at-risk/special populations.

SWK 602 Policy II: Social Welfare Policies and Services: Social Provisions and a Framework for Policy Analysis

This course is the second class in the policy sequence. Students explore the modern welfare state from local, state, federal and national perspectives and learn about those factors which contribute to the existence of social problems. Students are introduced to a framework for policy analysis and related concepts such as the basis of social allocations, and the nature of social provisions. The course also provides students with develop a deeper understanding of the social work profession’s role in advocacy and social action for policy change. Information about government benefits and programs including those that address income support, family and child welfare, disability, aging, substance abuse, and health care are also provided.
Prerequisite: SWK Policy I

SWK 611 Social Work Practice I: Working with Individuals and Groups

The first of four practice courses this course provides a foundation for social work practice on micro and mezzo levels with diverse populations in a variety of settings. It provides an overview of the values, ethics and knowledge base upon which social work practice is based. The course provides a generalist problem solving approach to the understanding of social work practice with individuals and groups. Building upon the generalist model this course demonstrates the linkages between a generalist perspective and an integrated theoretical perspective for advanced practice with individuals and groups. The course includes historical content, person in-environment and systems perspectives, communication and relationship-building exercises, a walk-through of a clinical interview and the stages of treatment, an integrated clinical approach to individual and group practice and an application of generalist and advanced practice skills with groups in specific settings.
Required Co-Requisite: HBSE I

SWK 612 Social Work Practice II: Working with Families

The second of three courses in the Practice Sequence, this course focuses on working with families and the individuals within the family through the life span. Developing an understanding of the interplay between the developmental issues of the individual and the life stages of the family as a unit, through the life span, will be a primary focus of the course. Another primary focus of the course is an exploration of the work of various family theorists and their varied methods of intervention. Special emphasis will be placed on psychodynamic systems and cognitive/behavioral theories and techniques of intervention.

SWK 613 Social Work Practice III: Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities

This practice course focuses on macro social work practice within a systems perspective. The course clarifies the common elements of practice with systems of all sizes and identifies the application of micro and mezzo strategies of intervention within the organizational and community context, e.g. work with teams, coalitions, boards.

The course provides an introduction to role theory and its application to collaboration and other forms of multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary activity. The course begins with an analysis of the worker’s role within the organization, starting with the historical antecedents of social work practice in this macro arena.

Practice 3 demonstrates the relationship of the generalist intervention model (GIM) to work with organizations and the various tasks of the social worker at different phases of intervention. The second half of the course focuses on social work practice with communities. The curriculum includes a systems perspective for understanding communities with an emphasis on ecological and social systems, demographic development, social stratification, and political and economic systems. The course highlights the factors that define power in the community and the worker’s role in promoting social and economic justice. The course includes an analysis of the application of the generalist intervention model (GIM) to the change process in communities. The course includes material on value conflicts and value conflict resolution in social work practice with organizations and communities as well as strategies for evaluation of practice.
Course Pre-Requisites: Practice 1, HBSE I, Policy I

SWK 614 Advance Principle of Admin & Clinical Practice within an Interdisciplinary Context

The course is designed to orient advanced standing students to advanced practice knowledge introduced in the first year of the two year M.S.W program to close a knowledge gap between advanced standing students and regularly matriculated students. As such, the course provides a theoretical orientation to the interdisciplinary context of social work practice; identifies the components of role conflict resolution; and, explores strategies for promoting interdisciplinary collaboration. Building upon the generalist model, this course demonstrates the linkages between a generalist perspective and an integrated theoretical perspective for advanced clinical practice with individuals and groups. The course also explores commonalities and differences between a generalist perspective for working with families and more specialized approaches. Special emphasis is placed on psychodynamic systems and cognitive/behavioral theories and techniques of intervention with individuals, groups and families.

SWK 621 HBSE I: Birth through Adolescence

This course, the first of two in this sequence, provides the theoretical and empirical support for several social work values, practice skills, and ethical standards. These values and standards include respect for the dignity and uniqueness of the individual, respect of a persons’ right to self-determination, and respect for spirituality and the religious beliefs of others. In addition to biological, psychological, and social development, the course covers moral development and the acquisition of skills necessary to lead a civil, moral, and fulfilling life.

SWK 622 HBSE II: Young Adulthood through Late Adulthood

The second in the sequence of two HBSE courses, this course continues to provide theoretical and empirical support for social work values and ethics while providing the generalist practitioner with the knowledge necessary to work with individuals, groups, communities, and systems of all sizes. With the focus on early, middle, and late adulthood, the social work values that are emphasized in the course embrace larger systems such as family relationships, communities, organizations, and socio-economic policies.
Prerequisites: HBSE I

SWK 623 Human Service Organizations and Administrative Behavior: A context for Social Work

This course provides students with a conceptual framework for understanding human service organizations with a special emphasis on the social work field. It explores the role and function of the agency-based social work practitioner and manager through the study of organizational behavior and structural theory. Students also consider the function of human service organizations within the context of economic, political, social and technological factors and the ways in which they influence administration and service delivery. The course provides an overview of the responsibilities necessary to support effective and efficient quality services to clients including how to manage information, finances and people.
Prerequisite: SWK Policy I, SWK Policy II

SWK 650 Psychopathology

This course provides a bio-psycho-social perspective to a range of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Ed. (DSM-IV) classified maladaptive behaviors that are exhibited by many social work clients. It provides an in-depth study of the etiology, course, prognosis, and resolution of major psychological and psychiatric conditions. The DSM-IV multi-axial system will serve as a backdrop and context in which these conditions will be presented and studied. The Competency Based- Assessment Model, which follows a “process of reviewing and understanding an individual’s past in order to distinguish and interpret present concerns,” (Zide & Grey 12001) is the theoretical and philosophical framework through which the course’s information will flow. Student will become familiar with DSM-IV diagnostic criteria and the empirical and epidemiological data that supports each diagnosis. The course will also look at the behaviors that are evaluated in the process of arriving at a differential diagnosis. The cultural context will play a major role in understanding these conditions.
Prerequisites: HBSE I & II, Research I

SWK 701 Field Instruction I

This is the first course in a four semester Field Instruction sequence in the Masters in Social Work program. The first two semesters of Field Instruction provide the Foundation and the second two semesters provide the Specialization. The Foundation prepares students 1) to function at a beginning level of competence in a social service delivery system 2) to develop generalist problem-solving and relationship-building skills, 3) and to integrate and apply knowledge from Practice, Policy, HBSE and Research to work with clients.
Co-Requisites: Field Instruction I is taken concurrently with Practice I, Human Behavior and the Social Environment I, Research I, and Policy I.

SWK 702 Field Instruction II

Field Instruction II is the second course in the field practicum sequence and represents the culmination of the Foundation year. Field Instruction II provides students with the opportunity to further integrate and build upon the knowledge, values and skills assimilated during the previous semester. Students further their proficiency in intervening with diverse problems and multiple sized systems, develop more intensive interactive helping skills, become better adept at writing process records and other agency records, assume more responsibility in supervision and inter-professional collaboration, and utilize research and the skills of policy practice to benefit clients. They are increasingly expected to apply a multi-layered understanding of generalist practice concepts and skills to their work with clients. Students gain greater awareness of their own value base and its compatibility to professional social work values, and can utilize more sophisticated expression of their dilemmas through the supervisory and self-evaluative process. They must also demonstrate greater professional responsibility by preparing supervisory agendas, monitor both learning and client goals by evaluating progress made toward both. Learning contracts are further refined, and tasks are operationalized and tethered to the mid-semester field evaluation. Again, students are required to participate in the self-evaluation process continually throughout the semester both in oral and written evaluation sessions, as well as evaluating their field experience and supervisor.
Co-Requisites: Practice II, HBSE II, Policy II

SWK 703 Field Instruction III

This is the third course in a four semester Field Instruction sequence in the Masters in Social Work program. The first two semesters of Field Instruction provide the Foundation and the second two semesters provide the Specialization. The Specialization year prepares students 1) to gain expertise in gerontology, nonprofit management, substance and alcohol abuse, or child and family welfare 2) to function at an advanced level of competence in a social service delivery system 2) to continue to practice problem-solving and relationship-building skills, 3) and to continue to integrate and apply knowledge from Practice, Policy, Human Behavior in the Social Environment and Research to work with client systems.
Pre-Requisites: Field Instruction I, II

SWK 704/800 Field Instruction IV

This is the fourth course in a four semester Field Instruction sequence in the Masters in Social Work program. The first two semesters of Field Instruction provide the Foundation and the second two semesters provide the Specialization. The Specialization year prepares students to 1) gain expertise in gerontology, nonprofit management, substance and alcohol abuse, or child and family welfare; 2) to function at an advanced level of competence in a social service delivery system; 3) to continue to practice problem-solving and relationship-building skills; 4) and to further develop and integrate and apply knowledge from Practice, Policy, HBSE and Research to work with client systems.
Pre-requisites: Field Instruction I, II, III
Co-requisites: Field Instruction IV is taken concurrently with Administrative Behavior, two concentration courses and the Capstone Seminar.

SWK 790 Capstone

This course, offered in the spring semester of the concentration year is intended to provide students with the academic framework within which they design and implement the capstone project. Students review their knowledge about role conflict within interdisciplinary setting that is related to their respective areas of concentration studies.

Students then choose a topic related to the concentration area and design and carry out a research project that examines role conflict within an interdisciplinary context of social work. Finally, students design a solution to the role conflict that is embedded in interdisciplinary collaborative practice of social work. The course focuses on application of skills that have been taught in previous semesters within a particular area of concentration. Such skill include: Critical thinking, ethical practice, practice skills in systems of all sizes, research skills, communication skills, organizational skills and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Concentration Courses

Child and Family Welfare

The Child and Family Welfare concentration prepares graduates to work with children, families and communities. The course work was developed in collaboration with child welfare staff to incorporate the requisite knowledge, values and skills that advanced practitioners need to work with and on behalf of children and their families. Students will develop their understanding about policies and services specific to children and families, family violence across the lifespan, community based practice with children and families, and childhood psychopathology to prepare them to work in multiple public and private child welfare settings.

SWK 660 Families &Children: Policies & Services

This course enables students to build upon their knowledge of social welfare policy and services and apply this knowledge to the needs of children and their families. It presents students with knowledge of concepts, policies and practices, which characterize child welfare services in American society. It provides historical and legal information about various policies and programs within family and children’s services at the federal, state and local levels and examines the multiple systems that influence the life of children and their families. In addition, it explores current trends, controversial and topical issues in child welfare and family services and the social worker’s role in an interdisciplinary approach, and how to advocate for individuals and families.

SWK 661 Family Violence across the Lifespan

This course examines the problem and consequences of family violence across the lifespan and its impact on children. It presents theoretical, research, policy and practice issues involving intra-familial child abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence, child witnessing of intimate partner violence, and elder abuse. It explores individual and group level interventions, structural influences on family violence, and policy implications in the field of social work. In addition, the course will emphasize rights to safety and safety planning for populations at-risk within the context of social justice with an emphasis of how interdisciplinary approach can assist in the empowerment of survivors of abuse.

SWK 662 Community Based Practice with Children and Families

This course provides students with the opportunity to hear community based practitioners present actual case studies based on a “case of the week” model. These cases provide students with the opportunity to review family and children type cases presented by local practitioners. Each case will present a client profile, history, bio-psycho-social assessment and Questions/Discussion to precede the practitioner’s discussion of the actual case outcome/current standing. Cases will come from a variety of organizations including some that focus on prevention, child abuse and maltreatment, foster care and adoption substance abuse, physical and emotional disabilities, health and mental health.

SWK 663 Child Psychology

This course provides a bio-psycho-social developmental perspective to a range of childhood disorders as they are classified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Ed Text Revised. (DSM-IV-TR). It provides an in-depth study of the etiology, course, prognosis, and resolution of major psychological and psychiatric conditions that are encountered by children with an emphasis on a family and system approach to the conceptualization and treatment of such conditions. The DSM-IV multiaxial system will serve as a backdrop and context in which these conditions will be presented and studied. A developmental-systems (Mash and Barkley, 1996) approach will guide the theoretical and philosophical framework of this course as the students become familiar with DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for childhood psychopathology and the empirical and epidemiological data that supports each diagnosis. The course will look at internalizing and externalizing disorders of childhood that social workers are likely to encounter in various settings of practice (e.g., schools, hospitals, community centers, adoption agencies, ACS and DSS agencies). The students will learn to consider issues such as adaptation, age appropriateness, clusters and patterns of symptoms and behaviors that are instrumental in the process of differential diagnosis. The cultural context will play a major role in understanding these conditions and the differential validity, to the extent to which it exists, in assessment and treatment of children.

Gerontology

Students in the Gerontology concentration will learn to understand the physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs of older people and the major issues, concepts and theories in late-stage functioning. Students who choose this concentration may focus on one of two areas: direct client service through Senior Community Service or leadership roles in Long-Term Care Administration. The advanced concentration in gerontology includes two tracks for specialized study: (1) Long term care administration; and, (2) Senior community services: micro, mezzo and macro practice. These two tracks meet the advanced curriculum objectives in providing advanced clinical and/or administrative knowledge in gerontology; and in furthering knowledge of the application of a collaborative approach in the interdisciplinary context.

The courses are offered in collaboration with the Department of Health Care and Public Administration on the C.W. Post Campus and with the School of Business, Public Administration & Information Sciences at the Brooklyn Campus, and they include a common base of knowledge for practice in both disciplines. Each track provides for the analysis of variations in role of health care administrators, social workers and other members of the interdisciplinary team and for the resolution of interdisciplinary role conflicts. As an added benefit, graduates of both gerontology tracks my also qualify for a New York State Advanced Certificate by taking just one additional course, which is offered by Long Island University.

Gerontology – Long Term Care (Track I)

Those who take the Long Term Care Administration track will gain an in-depth understanding of health care facility administration, health care financing, legal issues in health care, and personnel management. The Long Term Care Administration track meets most of the academic requirements for eligibility for the Nursing Home Administrator’s licensing examination in New York State.

PM 738 Gerontology: Processes of Aging

The course surveys the multidisciplinary field of gerontology. Theoretical approaches and research findings about the processes of aging are reviewed with emphasis on interventions to facilitate optimal functioning in older adults.

PM 739 Long Term Care Administration

Long Term Care Administration must consider the special administrative and organizational methods, social systems and population that are attributable to all kinds of residential and long term care facilities as separate entities from acute care hospitals. The course will include an overview of the long term care continuum, including community care, management issues, human resources, finance, pertinent laws and regulations and patient requirement and needs. Care and treatment standards will be reviewed and discussed, as well as policy changes and government trends associated with the new paradigm of aging in the 21st Century.

Choose 2 out of 3 of the following:

MPA 602 Human Resource Administration in the Health Sector

The contribution of behavioral science as it relates to motivational systems and organizational relationships are examined. This class will become a venue for developing and utilizing managerial and negotiating skills. Course content includes personnel administration with specific focus on job analysis, planning, recruitment, training, appraisal, career development, labor relations and compensation systems.

MPA 616 Legal Aspects in Health

This course will provide a basic introduction to the legal system, including tort law, criminal aspects of health care, and civil and trial practice. It will also cover legal issues in the management of health care administration such as corporate and physician liability. Legal reporting obligations, patients’ rights and responsibilities, emerging issues in health care, and the system of the financing of health care (Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance) are included. Finally, issues such as health care proxies, living wills, living trusts, and guardianship proceedings are covered.

HAD 603 Foundations in Budgeting and Finance in Health Care

The course covers the principles of budget and finance and includes the following topics: budgetary systems, methods, processes and cycles, preparation, justification and financial information systems. The course also includes a survey of the federal prospective payment system and other current developments in reimbursement methods. It provides a depth of understanding in the area of budget and finance that is critical to administrative functioning in long term care. In conjunction with the others, this course meets the academic requirements for licensing as a nursing home administrator in New York State.

Gerontology – Senior Community Service (Track II)

The Senior Community Service track incorporates both clinical and administrative content areas. Students on this track will learn to plan and develop community services for older adults; perform intervention and treatment planning and understand and manage issues of death, dying, bereavement and loss.

PM 738 Gerontology: Processes of Aging

The course surveys the multidisciplinary field of gerontology. Theoretical approaches and research findings about the processes of aging are reviewed with emphasis on interventions to facilitate optimal functioning in older adults.

HAD 726 Interdisciplinary Assessment

This course provides a collaborative framework for comprehensively assessing the needs of elderly clients and client populations, and for the development of better linkages among disciplines serving the elderly. It promotes a clarification of the roles of different practitioners and the purpose of different health, financial legal and social services organizations serving the elderly in the community.

Choose 2 out of the 3 of the following:

HAD 712 The Management of Senior Community Programs

This course provides an understanding of the basic skills necessary to manage programs and services for older adults living in the community. These skills include: local outreach, assisting with information and referrals, and applying the latest technologies to development and design of programs in the context of relevant laws and regulations. The course distinguishes between the role of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations as well as government and public programs, while demonstrating the application of management strategies in various service arenas. Study includes housing, healthcare, community based long term care, legislation and social services, economics, transportation, criminal justice, politics, education, religion, work and retirement. Course content emphasizes effective collaboration among the multidisciplinary team members who serve community – dwelling older adults.

HAD 729 Bereavement: Psychological, Cultural and Institutional Perspectives

This course is designed to explore the stages and issues related to dying and grieving. Cultural diversities in the grieving process will be identified. Myths and ideas that inhibit, isolate and interfere with the bereavement experience will be examined. Political, medical, legal and ethical issues will be analyzed. Students’ values, attitudes and fears will be explored in order to inform their interventions. Social, cultural and personal issues that govern a person’s reaction to death and dying will be highlighted. In addition, students will learn to design organization structures for interdisciplinary assessment and service delivery in settings serving the dying and bereaved.

HAD 728 Financial Estate and Retirement Planning

Examination of estate, disability, and financial planning tools used by the elder law attorney with analyses of laws, regulations, and programs upon which planning is based. Topics include advanced directives, power of attorney, long-term care, Medicaid, and planning for asset distribution on death.

Nonprofit Management

Long Island University M.S.W Program offers an innovative curriculum in non-profit management in collaboration with the Department of Health Care and Public Administration on the C.W. Post Campus and the School of Business, Public Administration & Information Sciences at the Brooklyn Campus. It meets the advanced curriculum objectives by providing knowledge and skill needed for administering and working with non-profit human service organizations in an interdisciplinary context. Non-profit organizations have different governance structures, funding sources, missions, and staffing characteristics than private-for-profit or public sector organizations. It provides students with the knowledge, values and skills to work effectively in and administer programs in virtually any segment of the social service community, from child welfare to health and mental health, and in a variety of programs addressing a broad range of social issues from hunger and homelessness to women at risk.

This advanced concentration is designed to provide an interdisciplinary classroom experience and experiential learning opportunities for social work students planning a career in non-profit management and social services. Upon completion of the M.S.W degree with a concentration in non-profit management, graduates may also qualify for an Advanced Certificate in Non-profit Management by taking just one additional course, which is offered by Long Island University.

The five courses in this concentration include: NPM 650: Introduction to Nonprofit Management; NPM 651: Fundraising and Development for Nonprofit Organizations; NPM 652: Human Resource Management in Nonprofit Organizations; NPM 653: Financial Management in Nonprofit Organizations; and NPM 654: Legal, Ethical and Governance Issues in Nonprofit Organizations.

NPM 650 Introduction to Nonprofit Management

This course introduces students to nonprofit management, beginning with the history of philanthropy and the emergence of the nonprofit sector. It provides students with historical and contemporary understanding of the creation of and changing structure of nonprofit organizations and the nonprofit sector including factors that impact on individual clients, staff and the larger community. It includes an exploration of classical organizational theory as well as current management practices as they relate to nonprofit organizations. Special attention is focused on topical management issues including interdisciplinary collaboration, mergers, and strategic planning.

NPM 651 Fundraising & Development for Nonprofit Organizations

Building on the knowledge gained in NMP 650 on the structure and functioning of human and social services, this course provides depth of understanding in the area of fundraising and development – an area that is critical to maintain the existence of many social services agencies. The course provides students with an overview of existing sources of funding for nonprofit social service organizations. It explains the director of development and fundraising’s roles in acquiring and developing financial resources for the organizations. It addresses mechanisms for raising money including donor profiles, foundation and corporate philanthropy, government grant and contract programs, special events, marketing and public relations functions, direct mail and membership campaigns, planned giving, major gifts, and capital campaigns. Ethical and legal issues related to fundraising are also addressed. Students will also obtain skills in assessing several environmental considerations including those related to the social, political and economic arenas where social service organizations are present.

MPA 602 Human Resource Management/Nonprofit Organizations

The course provides an overview of human resources management (HRM) in the public and nonprofit sectors. It is designed to help students identify established traditional and contemporary (HRM) theories and suggest how these concepts can be incorporated into their management practice. The course also seeks to provide students with an understanding of HRM methods and functions, such as recruitment, labor relations, compensation, volunteer management and training. Additionally, the course will assist students in placing HRM in context by discussing ecological and cultural implications, strategic planning, technology, and legal and regulatory issues. Students will be encouraged to identify current challenges in public and nonprofit HRM and explore solutions to these concerns.

MPA 602 Human Resource Management in Non-Profit Organizations

Building on the knowledge gained in Introduction to Non-profit Management (NMP 650) the HRM course is designed to provide students with essential management knowledge and skills to understand the role and function of HR in non-profit organizations. It is designed to strengthen students’ knowledge of what motivates people to perform and factors that contribute to their satisfaction with the job. Many non-profit social service organizations run on a tight budget and face high staff turnover. This course addresses methods for approaching these issues. HRM topics such as ethical and legal issues, recruiting and hiring practices, diversity in the workplace, compensation and benefits, performance appraisal, grievance mechanisms and discipline are also explored.

NPM 653 Financial Management in Non-profit Organizations

This course offers students interdisciplinary knowledge of financial management concepts and techniques required for effective management of non-profit social service organizations. It provides specialized knowledge that is fundamental to help future non-profit leaders and staff adapt the organization to its ever changing fiscal environment. Topics include non-profit accounting, budget management, revenue forecasting, financial statements/reports tax issues, grant compliance, internal expenditure control, audits, cash flow management, long-term planning, endowment management, and capital financing. Building on the foundation knowledge gained in NMP 650, specific applications to financial issues in non-profit and public health and human services are also addressed.

NPM 654 Legal, Ethical & Governance Issues in Nonprofit Organizations

This course examines the laws affecting the establishment and operation of nonprofit organizations, including incorporation and tax exempt status, general liability, regulatory compliance/reporting and contracts. The course explores the roles, responsibilities, processes and powers of boards of directors including issues of board liability. The nonprofit agency’s advocacy responsibilities and opportunities and ethical issues are examined and discussed.

Alcohol & Substance Abuse

The LIU M.S.W Program offers students the opportunity to simultaneously acquire the certificate in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling while earning their M.S.W degree. The Certificate is offered in collaboration with and through the LIU-Brooklyn Campus Continuing Education Department.

Students will achieve the following:

  1. Identify the collaborative role for social work in the area of alcohol and substance abuse.
  2. Comply with New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (NYSOASAS) standards and significantly contributing to the completion of the required 350 clock hours of classroom instruction in the following areas:

    - Knowledge of alcoholism and substance abuse
    - Alcohol and substance abuse counseling
    - Assessment, clinical evaluation, treatment planning, case management, and client, family, and community education.
    - Professional and ethical responsibilities and documentation
    - Significantly contribute to the documented completion of 2000 hours of full time paid work experience.

The Alcohol and Substance Abuse Curriculum meets the advanced curriculum objectives of the M.S.W Program by preparing social workers to work collaboratively with other professionals, and provides the graduate student with advanced knowledge and skills for working with a discrete population. The process also leads to the CASAC, a credential that is in high demand in the New York tri-state area. The courses in this area of concentration include:

SWK 674 Theories and Principles of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling

This course will introduce students to the basic theories and principles of alcoholism and substance abuse counseling, as well as techniques for motivating the chemically dependent client to engage in treatment. Emphasis will be placed on the theories of vocational counseling and the relationship between work, self-esteem, and recovery.

SWK 675 Introduction to the Techniques of Substance Abuse Counseling

This course provides students with a foundation in basic and techniques of counseling the substance abuse population. Students will receive a comprehensive overview of chemical dependency treatment and explore various counselor intervention methods. The qualities and professional skills necessary for competent and effective practice will also be thoroughly examined.

SWK 677 Sociological and Psychological Aspects of Substance Abuse

This course will offer students a comprehensive view of alcohol and drug use and alcoholism and addiction from a historical perspective. Utilizing cultural attitudes, legal sanctions and normative values regarding alcohol and drug use, students will analyze what addiction is and who is an addict as defined by various disciplines (i.e. medicine, sociology, psychology, etc.) and systems (i.e. family, criminal justice, social service etc.). Students will examine ethnicity and its role in substance abuse and counseling. Students should be prepared to think critically and engage in a dialogue regarding the complex bio-psycho-social issues that impact alcoholics and/or addicts as well as the substance abuse counselor.

SWK 678 Physical and Pharmacological Effects of Substance Abuse

This course will examine how the abuse of alcohol and other drugs affect the body with emphasis on the central nervous system, organ systems and general physical health. The physiological basis for the disease concept of addiction will be reviewed. Psychoactive drug categories will be explored in relation to the history of use, routes of administration and how the body processes licit and illicit substances. The effects of drugs and pharmacological interactions on metabolic processes and neuropsychological functioning will be discussed.