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Si Sheppard

Si Sheppard

Assistant Professor of Political Science

B.A., Auckland University, New ZealandM.A., Victoria University of Wellington, New ZealandPh.D., Johns Hopkins University


Si Sheppard is a 2008 graduate of Johns Hopkins University, majoring in American politics with a minor in international relations.

Dr. Sheppard is an assistant professor of political science at LIU Brooklyn. His primary focus is American electoral history, specifically presidential campaigns and elections. He has also conducted extensive research into the politics of the future – the intersecting trajectories of culture and technology and the potentialities for social transcendence or collapse. He has been interviewed in print and on several radio and television programs and has made presentations at multiple conferences and seminars.


Political Parties, Campaigns and Elections, the Media, the Presidency, Geopolitics, Military History, Sociopolitical Decline and Collapse, Popular Culture and Politics, Dystopian Politics, Technology, Culture and Politics


  • Author, “The Jewish Revolt, 66-73” (forthcoming, 2013)
  • Author, “Actium, 31 BC” (2009)
  • Author, “Philippi, 42 BC” (2008)
  • Author, “The Partisan Press: A History of Media Bias in the United States” (2007)
  • Author, “Pharsalus, 48 BC” (2006)
  • Author, “Broken Circle: The Decline and Fall of the Fourth Labour Government” (1999)
  • Author, multiple published articles in professional journals, several dozen in print media and two book chapters


  • Honorary Member, Alpha Lambda Delta Freshman Honor Society
  • Recipient, Teaching Assistant of the Year Award, Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 2006; nominated finalist (2005)
  • Recipient, the Sir Desmond Todd Award for best M.A. or Ph.D. thesis in a political subject, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand (1997)

Professional Affiliations

  • Member, American Political Science Association
  • Member, New York State Political Science Association